Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am thinking about creating a persistent collection (lists or other) in C#, but I can't figure out a good API.

I use 'persistent' in the Clojure sense: a persistent list is a list that behaves as if it has value semantics instead of reference semantics, but does not incur the overhead of copying large value types. Persistent collections use copy-on-write to share internal structure. Pseudocode:

l1 = PersistentList()
l1.add("foo")
l1.add("bar")
l2 = l1
l1.add("baz")

print(l1) # ==> ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
print(l2) # ==> ["foo", "bar"]
# l1 and l2 share a common structure of ["foo", "bar"] to save memory

Clojure uses such datastructures, but additionally in Clojure all data structures are immutable. There is some overhead in doing all the copy-on-write stuff so Clojure provides a workaround in the form of transient datastructures that you can use if you are sure you're not sharing the datastructure with anyone else. If you have the only reference to a datastructure, why not mutate it directly instead of going through all the copy-on-write overhead.

One way to get this efficiency gain would be to keep a reference count on your datastructure (though I don't think Clojure works that way). If the refcount is 1, you're holding the only reference so do the updates destructively. If the refcount is higher, someone else is also holding a reference to it that's supposed to behave like a value type, so do copy-on-write to not disturb the other referrers.

In the API to such a datastructure, one could expose the refcounting, which makes the API seriously less usable, or one could not do the refcounting, leading to unnecessary copy-on-write overhead if every operation is COW'ed, or the API loses it's value type behaviour and the user has to manage when to do COW manually.

If C# had copy constructors for structs, this would be possible. One could define a struct containing a reference to the real datastructure, and do all the incref()/decref() calls in the copy constructor and destructor of the struct.

Is there a way to do something like reference counting or struct copy constructors automatically in C#, without bothering the API users?

Edit:

  • Just to be clear, I'm just asking about the API. Clojure already has an implementation of this written in Java.
  • It is certainly possible to make such an interface by using a struct with a reference to the real collection that is COW'ed on every operation. The use of refcounting would be an optimisation to avoid unnecessary COWing, but apparently isn't possible with a sane API.
share|improve this question
    
What methods do you need to support? I have an efficient idea for a collection which only supports 'add' and accessing (e.g. iterating) which drops down to O(N) for remove and replace operations. –  strager Nov 16 '10 at 0:10
    
Or are you asking about just the API and not implementations? –  strager Nov 16 '10 at 0:11
    
I hope otherwise, by I imagine you will be flummoxed trying to change such a basic assumption of how the the Common Language Runtime languages are designed (reference counted in the VM, inaccessible to the language-level user). What languages even let you change something so deep in the language, besides Lisp and C++? (or making your own language/runtime/CLR VM). –  Jared Updike Nov 16 '10 at 0:11
2  
@Jared: .NET does not use reference counting, nor do I think that he was asking how to gain access to anything in the runtime. He's asking if there is a way to implement your own reference counting scheme automatically, and the answer is "no" for value types. –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 0:15
    
@Adam: Right, since you can't enforce this and the API would require the consumer of the library to 'do the right thing' (manually call collection.IncRef(), DecRef(), etc.) it seems misguided on balance. I meant that references would have to be counted in the VM, if anywhere. Only C++ and Lisp (or editing some runtime or compiler) would let you create your own assignment semantics, which is what he is asking for. –  Jared Updike Nov 16 '10 at 1:33

4 Answers 4

What you're looking to do isn't possible, strictly speaking. You could get close by using static functions that do the reference counting, but I understand that that isn't a terrible palatable option.

Even if it were possible, I would stay away from this. While the semantics you describe may well be useful in Clojure, this cross between value type and reference type semantics will be confusing to most C# developers (mutable value types--or types with value type semantics that are mutable--are also usually considered Evil).

share|improve this answer
    
Checkout: PersistentDictionary class –  KMån Apr 19 '11 at 8:55

You may use the WeakReference class as an alternative to refcounting and achieve some of the benefits that refcounting gives you. When you hold the only copy to an object in a WeakReference, it will be garbage collected. WeakReference has some hooks for you to inspect whether that's been the case.

EDIT 3: While this approach does do the trick I'd urge you to stay away from persuing value semantics on C# collections. Users of your structure do not expect this kind of behavior on the platform. These semantics add confusion and the potential for mistakes.

EDIT 2: Added an example. @AdamRobinson: I'm afraid I was not clear how WeakReference can be of use. I must warn that performancewise, most of the time it might be even worse than doing a naive Copy-On-Write at every operation. This is due to the Garbage Collector call. Therefore this is merely an academic solution, and I cannot recommend it's use in production systems. It does do exactly what you ask however.

class Program
{

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    var l1 = default(COWList);
    l1.Add("foo"); // initialize
    l1.Add("bar"); // no copy
    l1.Add("baz"); // no copy
    var l2 = l1;
    l1.RemoveAt(0); // copy
    l2.Add("foobar"); // no copy
    l1.Add("barfoo"); // no copy
    l2.RemoveAt(1); // no copy
    var l3 = l2;
    l3.RemoveAt(1); // copy
    Trace.WriteLine(l1.ToString()); //  bar baz barfoo
    Trace.WriteLine(l2.ToString()); // foo baz foobar
    Trace.WriteLine(l3.ToString()); // foo foobar
  }
}

struct COWList
{
  List<string> theList; // Contains the actual data
  object dummy; // helper variable to facilitate detection of copies of this struct instance.
  WeakReference weakDummy; // helper variable to facilitate detection of copies of this struct instance.

  /// <summary>
  /// Check whether this COWList has already been constructed properly.  
  /// </summary>
  /// <returns>true when this COWList has already been initialized.</returns>
  bool EnsureInitialization()
  {
    if (theList == null)
    {
      theList = new List<string>();
      dummy = new object();
      weakDummy = new WeakReference(dummy);
      return false;
    }
    else
    {
      return true;
    }
  }

  void EnsureUniqueness()
  {
    if (EnsureInitialization())
    {

      // If the COWList has been copied, removing the 'dummy' reference will not kill weakDummy because the copy retains a reference.
      dummy = new object();

      GC.Collect(2); // OUCH! This is expensive. You may replace it with GC.Collect(0), but that will cause spurious Copy-On-Write behaviour.
      if (weakDummy.IsAlive) // I don't know if the GC guarantees detection of all GC'able objects, so there might be cases in which the weakDummy is still considered to be alive.
      {
        // At this point there is probably a copy.
        // To be safe, do the expensive Copy-On-Write
        theList = new List<string>(theList);
        // Prepare for the next modification
        weakDummy = new WeakReference(dummy);
        Trace.WriteLine("Made copy.");

      }
      else
      {
        // At this point it is guaranteed there is no copy.
        weakDummy.Target = dummy;
        Trace.WriteLine("No copy made.");

      }
    }
    else
    {

      Trace.WriteLine("Initialized an instance.");

    }
  }

  public void Add(string val)
  {
    EnsureUniqueness();
    theList.Add(val);
  }

  public void RemoveAt(int index)
  {
    EnsureUniqueness();
    theList.RemoveAt(index);
  }

  public override string ToString()
  {
    if (theList == null)
    {
      return "Uninitialized COWList";
    }
    else
    {
      var sb = new StringBuilder("[ ");
      foreach (var item in theList)
      {
        sb.Append("\"").Append(item).Append("\" ");
      }
      sb.Append("]");
      return sb.ToString();
    }
  }
}

This outputs:

Initialized an instance.
No copy made.
No copy made.
Made copy.
No copy made.
No copy made.
No copy made.
Made copy.
[ "bar" "baz" "barfoo" ]
[ "foo" "baz" "foobar" ]
[ "foo" "foobar" ]
share|improve this answer
    
-1; this does not address his question. –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 0:13
    
Arjen, I see that you edited your answer, but it's still not addressing his question. WeakReference only allows you to determine if a reference has been collected or not. It does not tell you if you hold the only reference, and the only time it tells you anything is after the object has already been collected (at which point it isn't going to do you a whole lot of good). –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 0:24
    
+2 cool but useless :-) –  JanKanis Nov 16 '10 at 12:03
1  
@Adam: Actually, it works. The idea is this: - The interface consists of a struct that holds a reference to the real data. Each struct also has a reference to a dummy object that corresponds to the data. - On every operation, do the following: make a weak reference to the dummy, and null the hard reference, then do a GC. If the dummy is still alive, that means there is some other struct having a hard ref to the dummy and therefore to the corresponding data, so do a COW. If the dummy is gone we held the only reference so do a destructive update. –  JanKanis Nov 16 '10 at 12:14
1  
Very interesting approach! I agree, though, that any benefit you might see by not copying the data on every operation is mitigated (if not overwhelmed!) by the expense of forcing GC. –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 13:58

I read what you're asking for, and I'm thinking of a "terminal-server"-type API structure.

First, define an internal, thread-safe singleton class that will be your "server"; it actually holds the data you're looking at. It will expose a Get and Set method that will take the string of the value being set or gotten, controlled by a ReaderWriterLock to ensure that the value can be read by anyone, but not while anyone's writing and only one person can write at a time.

Then, provide a factory for a class that is your "terminal"; this class will be public, and contains a reference to the internal singleton (which otherwise cannot be seen). It will contain properties that are really just pass-throughs for the singleton instance. In this way, you can provide a large number of "terminals" that will all see the same data from the "server", and will be able to modify that data in a thread-safe way.

You could use copy constructors and a list of the values accessed by each instance to provide copy-type knowledge. You can also mashup the value names with the object's handle to support cases where L1 and L2 share an A, but L3 has a different A because it was declared seperately. Or, L3 can get the same A that L1 and L2 have. However you structure this, I would very clearly document how it should be expected to behave, because this is NOT the way things behave in basic .NET.

share|improve this answer
3  
This doesn't address the most simple scenario of assignment. If you declare a variable foo, use your factory to get a value, then declare bar and simply assign the value of foo to it, neither foo nor bar have any clue about whether or not they can make destructive changes to the data source. While this is an inventive solution, I think it misses the point. –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 0:20
    
I missed the part about making destructive changes; I thought all the OP wanted was shared memory and thread-safe behavior. –  KeithS Nov 16 '10 at 0:29
    
Yeah, that's the real kicker; if the type has to be able to support simple assignments and be able to know whether or not it needs to copy the data in order to make a change, there's no real paradigm to support that using any combination of value and reference types. –  Adam Robinson Nov 16 '10 at 0:30
    
Certainly nothing that wouldn't very quickly eat up any shared memory gain in tracking references. –  KeithS Nov 16 '10 at 0:52

I'd like to have something like this on a flexible tree collection object of mine, though it wouldn't be by using value-type semantics (which would be essentially impossible in .net) but by having a clone generate a "virtual" deep clone instead of actually cloning every node within the collection. Instead of trying to keep an accurate reference count, every internal node would have three states:

  1. Flexible
  2. SharedImmutable
  3. UnsharedMutable

Calling Clone() on a sharedImmutable node would simply yield the original object; calling Clone on a Flexible node would turn it into a SharedImmutable one. Calling Clone on an unshared mutable node would create a new node holding clones of all its descendents; the new object would be Flexible.

Before an object could be written, it would have to be made UnsharedMutable. To make an object UnsharedMutable if it isn't already, make its parent (the node via which it was accessed) UnsharedMutable (recursively). Then if the object was SharedImmutable, clone it (using a ForceClone method) and update the parent's link to point to the new object. Finally, set the new object's state to UnsharedMutable.

An essential aspect of this technique would be having separate classes for holding the data and providing the interface to it. A statement like

MyCollection["this"]["that"]["theOther"].Add("George")
needs to be evaluated by having the indexing operations return an indexer class which holds a reference to MyCollection. At that point, the "Add" method could then be able to act upon whatever intermediate nodes it had to in order to perform any necessary copy-on-write operations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.