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How can I assign values to struct member character by character. I would like to do something like

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct s
{
    char  *z; 
};

int main ()
{

   struct s *ss;
   ss = malloc(2 * sizeof *ss);

   char *str = "Hello World-Bye Foo Bar";
   char *a = str;
   int i = 0;
   while (*a != '\0') {
       if (*a == '-')
           i++;
       else ss[i].z = *a; // can I do this?
       a++;
   }   
   for(i = 0; i<2; i++)
      printf("%s\n",ss[i].z);
}

So I can get something as:

ss[0].z = "Hello World"
ss[1].z = "-Bye Foo Bar"

Edit: Forgot to mention, the number of "-" in str might vary.

share|improve this question
    
@pmg: #s removed :) –  Mike Nov 16 '10 at 0:21
1  
I like it better like this. welcome to SO :-) –  pmg Nov 16 '10 at 0:23
    
The number of '-' in the string changing doesn't alter things much. You basically want to end up repeating the process I outlined so you terminate the previous string where you found the next '-' and call strdup again, but using the current string. –  Flexo Nov 16 '10 at 0:32
2  
Shouldn't that be "sizeof struct s" (or "sizeof *s")? –  Lee-Man Nov 16 '10 at 0:33
1  
struct s *ss; ss = malloc(2 * sizeof ss); This should be "sizeof *ss" not "sizeof ss" because ss is a pointer to a struct. Edit: Lee-man got to it first :) –  Marlon Nov 16 '10 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If const char *str wasn't const you could insert a '\0' to split the string into two. You'd need to shift the other chars to the "right" as well in doing so.

The cleaner solution is to use something like strdup to make two copies of the string, one of which you terminate early, the other of which you start the copy partway through:

e.g.

ss[0].z = strdup(str);
ss[1].z = strdup(strchr(str, '-'));
const size_t fist_part = strlen(str)-strlen(ss[1].z);
ss[0].z[first_part] = 0;

Update: You can use this, even with more than one '-'

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct s
{
    char  *z; 
};

int main ()
{
  struct s *ss;
  ss = malloc(20 * sizeof(struct s));

  const char *str = "Hello World-Bye Foo Bar-more-and-more-things";
  int i = 1;
  char *found = NULL;
  ss[0].z = strdup(str);
  while ((found = strchr(ss[i-1].z, '-'))) {
     // TODO: check found+1 is valid!
     ss[i].z = strdup(found+1);
     *found = 0;
     ++i;
  }   
  for(i = 0; i<6; i++)
     printf("%s\n",ss[i].z);

  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

In practice you want to be more careful to avoid bugs with unexpected inputs so you need to be sure you handle:

  • There is no '-' char
  • There is no '\0' char
  • allocation failure

Don't forget to free() too!

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the NUL terminator :-) –  pmg Nov 16 '10 at 0:11
    
@awoodland, thanks for your comment, I would prefer not to use strdup() in this case since I'm not sure how many "-" str will contain. –  Mike Nov 16 '10 at 0:18
    
If you don't duplicate the strings or allocate extra memory some how you can't do this. The problem is to split the string you need to insert an extra '\0' char every time you want to break it up, but to do this you need to a) have spare "space" within the string and b) be able to legally modify the string, neither of which is possible without at least one call to malloc, and much cleaner with one call per fragment of the string you wish to keep. –  Flexo Nov 16 '10 at 0:21
    
@Mike: just updated my example to show how it would work with more than one '-' char in the string. –  Flexo Nov 16 '10 at 0:44
    
@awoodland: Great, Thanks! Now it is much clear to me what you were saying about strdup() –  Mike Nov 16 '10 at 0:50

You will need to alloc new blocks of memory to hold the split strings (at least the first one).

char *s1, *s2, *a, *b;

const char *str = "Hello World-Bye Foo Bar";

s1 = malloc(strlen(str)+1);
s2 = malloc(strlen(str)+1);

a = str;

int i = 0;
ss[0].z = s1;
b = ss[0].z;
while (*a != '\0') {
    if (*a == '-') {
        i++;
        ss[i].z = s2;
        *b = ss[i].z;
        *b++ = *a;
    } else {
     // s[i].z = *a // can I do this? (yes, but it you might not be happy with the result :-)
        *b++ = *a; // try this instead...
    }
    a++;
}
share|improve this answer
 else ss[i].z = *a; // can I do this?

Yes, you can do that. BUT you need to allocate space for each z first ... and do not forget to NUL terminate the strings!

ss = malloc(2 * sizeof *ss);
ss[0].z = malloc(1000); /* don't do it */
ss[1].z = malloc(1000); /* like this!  */
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