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I believe this is another easy one for you LINQ masters out there. Is there any way I can separe a List into several separate lists of SomeObject, using the item index as the delimiter of each split?

Let me exemplify: I have a List<SomeObject> and I need a List<List<SomeObject>> or List<SomeObject>[], so that each of these resulting lists will contain a group of 3 items of the original list (sequentially).

eg.: Original List: [a, g, e, w, p, s, q, f, x, y, i, m, c]

Resulting lists: [a, g, e], [w, p, s], [q, f, x], [y, i, m], [c]

I'd also need the resulting lists size to be a parameter of this function.

Is it possible??

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15 Answers 15

up vote 171 down vote accepted

Try the following code.

public static List<List<object>> Split(List<object> source)
{
    return  source
        .Select((x, i) => new { Index = i, Value = x })
        .GroupBy(x => x.Index / 3)
        .Select(x => x.Select(v => v.Value).ToList())
        .ToList();
}

The idea is to first group the elements by indexes. Dividing by three has the effect of grouping them into groups of 3. Then convert each group to a list and the IEnumerable of List to a List of List's

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4  
GroupBy does an implicit sort. That can kill performance. What we need is some kind of inverse of SelectMany. –  yfeldblum Jan 7 '09 at 3:19
2  
@Justice, it would be nice to have a built-in partitioning system for IEnumerable. –  JaredPar Jan 7 '09 at 3:31
3  
@Justice, GroupBy might be implemented by hashing. How do you know GroupBy's implementation "can kill performance"? –  David B Jan 7 '09 at 14:43
2  
Take the extreme example of an infinite IEnumerable. GroupBy(x=>f(x)).First() will never yield a group. OP asked about lists, but if we write to work with IEnumerable, making only a single iteration, we reap the performance advantage. –  Colonel Panic Jul 11 '12 at 22:16
2  
@Nick Order is not preserved your way though. It is still a good thing to know but you'd be grouping them into (0,3,6,9,...), (1,4,7,10,...), (2,5,8,11,...). If order doesn't matter then it is fine but in this case it sounds like it matters. –  Reafexus Sep 5 '13 at 19:52

This question is a bit old, but I just wrote this, and I think it's a little more elegant than the other proposed solutions:

/// <summary>
/// Break a list of items into chunks of a specific size
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunksize)
{
    while (source.Any())
    {
        yield return source.Take(chunksize);
        source = source.Skip(chunksize);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
7  
+1 For generic Extension –  Mehdi LAMRANI Feb 1 '12 at 20:17
6  
Love this solution. I'd recommend adding this sanity check to prevent an infinite loop: if (chunksize <= 0) throw new ArgumentException("Chunk size must be greater than zero.", "chunksize"); –  mroach Mar 1 '12 at 16:34
5  
I like this, but it is not super efficient –  Sam Saffron May 3 '12 at 4:26
13  
I like this one but time efficiency is O(n²). You can iterate through the list and get an O(n) time. –  hIpPy Aug 30 '12 at 18:22
5  
@hIpPy, how is it n^2? Looks linear to me –  vivek maharajh Oct 9 '13 at 21:02

In general the approach suggested by TickleMeElmo works fine, in fact if you are passing in a List<T> it is hard to fault it, perhaps I would change it to:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ChunkTrivialBetter<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunksize)
{
   var pos = 0; 
   while (source.Skip(pos).Any())
   {
      yield return source.Skip(pos).Take(chunksize);
      pos += chunksize;
   }
}

Which will avoid massive call chains. Nonetheless, this approach has a general flaw. It materializes two enumerations per chunk, to highlight the issue try running:

foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(1, int.MaxValue).Chunk(8).Skip(100000).First())
{
   Console.WriteLine(item);
}
// wait forever 

To overcome this we can try Cameron's approach, which passes the above test in flying colors as it only walks the enumeration once.

Trouble is that it has a different flaw, it materializes every item in each chunk, the trouble with that approach is that you run high on memory.

To illustrate that try running:

foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(1, int.MaxValue)
               .Select(x => x + new string('x', 100000))
               .Clump(10000).Skip(100).First())
{
   Console.Write('.');
}
// OutOfMemoryException

Finally, any implementation should be able to handle out of order iteration of chunks, for example:

Enumerable.Range(1,3).Chunk(2).Reverse.ToArray()
// should return [3],[1,2]

Many highly optimal solutions like my first revision of this answer failed there. The same issue can be seen in casperOne's optimized answer.

To address all these issues you can use the following:

namespace ChunkedEnumerator
{
    public static class Extensions 
    {
        class ChunkedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
        {
            class ChildEnumerator : IEnumerator<T>
            {
                ChunkedEnumerable<T> parent;
                int position;
                bool done = false;
                T current;


                public ChildEnumerator(ChunkedEnumerable<T> parent)
                {
                    this.parent = parent;
                    position = -1;
                    parent.wrapper.AddRef();
                }

                public T Current
                {
                    get
                    {
                        if (position == -1 || done)
                        {
                            throw new InvalidOperationException();
                        }
                        return current;

                    }
                }

                public void Dispose()
                {
                    if (!done)
                    {
                        done = true;
                        parent.wrapper.RemoveRef();
                    }
                }

                object System.Collections.IEnumerator.Current
                {
                    get { return Current; }
                }

                public bool MoveNext()
                {
                    position++;

                    if (position + 1 > parent.chunkSize)
                    {
                        done = true;
                    }

                    if (!done)
                    {
                        done = !parent.wrapper.Get(position + parent.start, out current);
                    }

                    return !done;

                }

                public void Reset()
                {
                    // per http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.ienumerator.reset.aspx
                    throw new NotSupportedException();
                }
            }

            EnumeratorWrapper<T> wrapper;
            int chunkSize;
            int start;

            public ChunkedEnumerable(EnumeratorWrapper<T> wrapper, int chunkSize, int start)
            {
                this.wrapper = wrapper;
                this.chunkSize = chunkSize;
                this.start = start;
            }

            public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
            {
                return new ChildEnumerator(this);
            }

            System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
            {
                return GetEnumerator();
            }

        }

        class EnumeratorWrapper<T>
        {
            public EnumeratorWrapper (IEnumerable<T> source)
            {
                SourceEumerable = source;
            }
            IEnumerable<T> SourceEumerable {get; set;}

            Enumeration currentEnumeration;

            class Enumeration
            {
                public IEnumerator<T> Source { get; set; }
                public int Position { get; set; }
                public bool AtEnd { get; set; }
            }

            public bool Get(int pos, out T item) 
            {

                if (currentEnumeration != null && currentEnumeration.Position > pos)
                {
                    currentEnumeration.Source.Dispose();
                    currentEnumeration = null;
                }

                if (currentEnumeration == null)
                {
                    currentEnumeration = new Enumeration { Position = -1, Source = SourceEumerable.GetEnumerator(), AtEnd = false };
                }

                item = default(T);
                if (currentEnumeration.AtEnd)
                {
                    return false;
                }

                while(currentEnumeration.Position < pos) 
                {
                    currentEnumeration.AtEnd = !currentEnumeration.Source.MoveNext();
                    currentEnumeration.Position++;

                    if (currentEnumeration.AtEnd) 
                    {
                        return false;
                    }

                }

                item = currentEnumeration.Source.Current;

                return true;
            }

            int refs = 0;

            // needed for dispose semantics 
            public void AddRef()
            {
                refs++;
            }

            public void RemoveRef()
            {
                refs--;
                if (refs == 0 && currentEnumeration != null)
                {
                    var copy = currentEnumeration;
                    currentEnumeration = null;
                    copy.Source.Dispose();
                }
            }
        }

        public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunksize)
        {
            if (chunksize < 1) throw new InvalidOperationException();

            var wrapper =  new EnumeratorWrapper<T>(source);

            int currentPos = 0;
            T ignore;
            try
            {
                wrapper.AddRef();
                while (wrapper.Get(currentPos, out ignore))
                {
                    yield return new ChunkedEnumerable<T>(wrapper, chunksize, currentPos);
                    currentPos += chunksize;
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                wrapper.RemoveRef();
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int i = 10;
            foreach (var group in Enumerable.Range(1, int.MaxValue).Skip(10000000).Chunk(3))
            {
                foreach (var n in group)
                {
                    Console.Write(n);
                    Console.Write(" ");
                }
                Console.WriteLine();
                if (i-- == 0) break;
            }


            var stuffs = Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Chunk(2).ToArray();

            foreach (var idx in new [] {3,2,1})
            {
                Console.Write("idx " + idx + " ");
                foreach (var n in stuffs[idx])
                {
                    Console.Write(n);
                    Console.Write(" ");
                }
                Console.WriteLine();
            }

            /*

10000001 10000002 10000003
10000004 10000005 10000006
10000007 10000008 10000009
10000010 10000011 10000012
10000013 10000014 10000015
10000016 10000017 10000018
10000019 10000020 10000021
10000022 10000023 10000024
10000025 10000026 10000027
10000028 10000029 10000030
10000031 10000032 10000033
idx 3 7 8
idx 2 5 6
idx 1 3 4
             */

            Console.ReadKey();


        }

    }
}

There is also a round of optimisations you could introduce for out-of-order iteration of chunks, which is out of scope here.

As to which method you should choose? It totally depends on the problem you are trying to solve. If you are not concerned with the first flaw the simple answer is incredibly appealing.

Note as with most methods, this is not safe for multi threading, stuff can get weird if you wish to make it thread safe you would need to amend EnumeratorWrapper.

share|improve this answer
    
Would the bug be Enumerable.Range(0, 100).Chunk(3).Reverse().ToArray() being wrong, or Enumerable.Range(0, 100).ToArray().Chunk(3).Reverse().ToArray() throwing an exception? –  Cameron MacFarland May 3 '12 at 6:39
    
@SamSaffron I've updated my answer and simplified the code tremendously for what I feel is the prominent use case (and acknowledge the caveats). –  casperOne May 3 '12 at 15:45
    
What about chuncking IQueryable<>? My guess is that a Take/Skip approach would be optimal if we want to delegate a maximum of the operations to the provider –  Guillaume86 May 3 '12 at 16:45
    
@Guillaume86 I agree, if you have a IList or IQueryable you can take all sorts of shortcuts that would make this much faster (Linq does this internally for all sorts of other methods) –  Sam Saffron May 3 '12 at 21:53

You could use a number of queries that use Take and Skip, but that would add too many iterations on the original list, I believe.

Rather, I think you should create an iterator of your own, like so:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> GetEnumerableOfEnumerables<T>(
  IEnumerable<T> enumerable, int groupSize)
{
   // The list to return.
   List<T> list = new List<T>(groupSize);

   // Cycle through all of the items.
   foreach (T item in enumerable)
   {
     // Add the item.
     list.Add(item);

     // If the list has the number of elements, return that.
     if (list.Count == groupSize)
     {
       // Return the list.
       yield return list;

       // Set the list to a new list.
       list = new List<T>(groupSize);
     }
   }

   // Return the remainder if there is any,
   if (list.Count != 0)
   {
     // Return the list.
     yield return list;
   }
}

You can then call this and it is LINQ enabled so you can perform other operations on the resulting sequences.


In light of Sam's answer, I felt there was an easier way to do this without:

  • Iterating through the list again (which I didn't do originally)
  • Materializing the items in groups before releasing the chunk (for large chunks of items, there would be memory issues)
  • All of the code that Sam posted

That said, here's another pass, which I've codified in an extension method to IEnumerable<T> called Chunk:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, 
    int chunkSize)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (chunkSize <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("chunkSize",
        "The chunkSize parameter must be a positive value.");

    // Call the internal implementation.
    return source.ChunkInternal(chunkSize);
}

Nothing surprising up there, just basic error checking.

Moving on to ChunkInternal:

private static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ChunkInternal<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunkSize)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    Debug.Assert(source != null);
    Debug.Assert(chunkSize > 0);

    // Get the enumerator.  Dispose of when done.
    using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    do
    {
        // Move to the next element.  If there's nothing left
        // then get out.
        if (!enumerator.MoveNext()) yield break;

        // Return the chunked sequence.
        yield return ChunkSequence(enumerator, chunkSize);
    } while (true);
}

Basically, it gets the IEnumerator<T> and manually iterates through each item. It checks to see if there any items currently to be enumerated. After each chunk is enumerated through, if there aren't any items left, it breaks out.

Once it detects there are items in the sequence, it delegates the responsibility for the inner IEnumerable<T> implementation to ChunkSequence:

private static IEnumerable<T> ChunkSequence<T>(IEnumerator<T> enumerator, 
    int chunkSize)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    Debug.Assert(enumerator != null);
    Debug.Assert(chunkSize > 0);

    // The count.
    int count = 0;

    // There is at least one item.  Yield and then continue.
    do
    {
        // Yield the item.
        yield return enumerator.Current;
    } while (++count < chunkSize && enumerator.MoveNext());
}

Since MoveNext was already called on the IEnumerator<T> passed to ChunkSequence, it yields the item returned by Current and then increments the count, making sure never to return more than chunkSize items and moving to the next item in the sequence after every iteration (but short-circuited if the number of items yielded exceeds the chunk size).

If there are no items left, then the InternalChunk method will make another pass in the outer loop, but when MoveNext is called a second time, it will still return false, as per the documentation (emphasis mine):

If MoveNext passes the end of the collection, the enumerator is positioned after the last element in the collection and MoveNext returns false. When the enumerator is at this position, subsequent calls to MoveNext also return false until Reset is called.

At this point, the loop will break, and the sequence of sequences will terminate.

This is a simple test:

static void Main()
{
    string s = "agewpsqfxyimc";

    int count = 0;

    // Group by three.
    foreach (IEnumerable<char> g in s.Chunk(3))
    {
        // Print out the group.
        Console.Write("Group: {0} - ", ++count);

        // Print the items.
        foreach (char c in g)
        {
            // Print the item.
            Console.Write(c + ", ");
        }

        // Finish the line.
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

Output:

Group: 1 - a, g, e,
Group: 2 - w, p, s,
Group: 3 - q, f, x,
Group: 4 - y, i, m,
Group: 5 - c,

An important note, this will not work if you don't drain the entire child sequence or break at any point in the parent sequence. This is an important caveat, but if your use case is that you will consume every element of the sequence of sequences, then this will work for you.

Additionally, it will do strange things if you play with the order, just as Sam's did at one point.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the best solution... the only problem is that list doesn't have Length... it has Count. But that's easy to change. We can make this better by not even constructing Lists but returning ienumerables that contain references to the main list with a offset/length combination. So then, if the groupsize is big, we don't waste memory. Comment if you want me to write it up. –  Amir Nov 18 '09 at 4:39
    
@Amir i'd like to see that written up –  samandmoore May 31 '11 at 15:38
    
This is nice and fast - Cameron posted a very similar one as well after yours, only caveat is that it buffers chunks, this can lead to out-of-memory if chunks and item sizes are big. See my answer for an alternative, albeit much hairier, answer. –  Sam Saffron May 3 '12 at 11:59
    
@SamSaffron Yeah, if you have a large number of items in the List<T>, you are obviously going to have memory issues because of the buffering. In retrospect, I should have noted that in the answer, but it seemed at the time the focus was on too many iterations. That said, your solution is indeed hairier. I haven't tested it, but now it has me wondering if there's a less hairy solution. –  casperOne May 3 '12 at 12:05
    
@SamSaffron Of course that means I'd have to stop doing things like meta, processing flags, etc, so not sure where my time is best spent =P –  casperOne May 3 '12 at 12:05

Here's a list splitting routine I wrote a couple months ago:

public static List<List<T>> Chunk<T>(
    List<T> theList,
    int chunkSize
)
{
    List<List<T>> result = theList
        .Select((x, i) => new {
            data = x,
            indexgroup = i / chunkSize
        })
        .GroupBy(x => x.indexgroup, x => x.data)
        .Select(g => new List<T>(g))
        .ToList();

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note: slow performance. –  David B Jun 27 '11 at 14:49
    
Improved version: stackoverflow.com/a/5221464/8155 –  David B Jul 12 '12 at 18:58

System.Interactive provides Buffer() for this purpose. Some quick testing shows performance is similar to Sam's solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
do you know the buffering semantics? eg: if you have an enumerator that spits out strings that are 300k big and try to split it into 10,000 size chunks will you get an out of memory? –  Sam Saffron May 3 '12 at 11:52
    
Buffer() returns IEnumerable<IList<T>> so yeah, you'd probably have a problem there - it doesn't stream like yours. –  dahlbyk May 3 '12 at 19:53

We can improve @JaredPar's solution to do true lazy evaluation. We use a GroupAdjacentBy method that yields groups of consecutive elements with the same key:

sequence
.Select((x, i) => new { Value = x, Index = i })
.GroupAdjacentBy(x=>x.Index/3)
.Select(g=>g.Select(x=>x.Value))

Because the groups are yielded one-by-one, this solution works efficiently with long or infinite sequences.

share|improve this answer

Ok, here's my take on it:

  • completely lazy: works on infinite enumerables
  • no intermediate copying/buffering
  • O(n) execution time

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunkify<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, 
                                                      int chunkSize)
{
    if (chunkSize < 1) throw new ArgumentException("chunkSize must be positive");

    using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            yield return enumerator.GetChunk(chunkSize);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> GetChunk<T>(this IEnumerator<T> enumerator,
                                          int chunkSize)
{
    do yield return enumerator.Current; 
    while (--chunkSize > 0 && enumerator.MoveNext());
}

Warning

To use this you must enumerate over the inner IEnumerable, otherwise you'll get unexpected results.

Usage

var src = new [] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}; 

var sums = src.Chunkify(3).Select(c=>c.Sum());  // { 6, 15 }

var nChunks1 = src.Chunkify(3).Count();                        // NOT OK  => 6
var nChunks2 = src.Chunkify(3).Select(c=>c.ToArray()).Count(); // OK  => 2
share|improve this answer
1  
Very nice. My "correct" solution was way more complicated than that. This is the #1 answer IMHO. –  CaseyB Jan 8 at 21:37
    
This suffers from unexpected (from an API standpoint) behavior when ToArray() is called, it is also not thread-safe. –  aolszowka May 13 at 13:57
    
@aolszowka: could you please elaborate? –  3dGrabber May 14 at 8:40
    
@3dGrabber Perhaps it was how I re-factored your code (sorry its a bit too long to past here, basically instead of an extension method I passed in the sourceEnumerator). The test case I used was something to this effect: int[] arrayToSort = new int[] { 9, 7, 2, 6, 3, 4, 8, 5, 1, 10, 11, 12, 13 }; var source = Chunkify<int>(arrayToSort, 3).ToArray(); Resulted in Source indicating that there were 13 chunks (the number of elements). This made sense to me as unless you queried the inner enumerations the Enumerator was not incremented. –  aolszowka May 14 at 14:40
1  
@aolszowka: very valid points. I've added a warning and a usage section. The code assumes that you iterate over the inner enumerable. With your solution you forfeit the laziness though. I think it should be possible to get the best of both worlds with a custom, caching IEnumerator. If I find a solution I'll post it here... –  3dGrabber May 20 at 9:10

If the list is of type system.collections.generic you can use the "CopyTo" method available to copy elements of your array to other sub arrays. You specify the start element and number of elements to copy.

You could also make 3 clones of your original list and use the "RemoveRange" on each list to shrink the list to the size you want.

Or just create a helper method to do it for you.

share|improve this answer

We found David B's solution worked the best. But we adapted it to a more general solution:

list.GroupBy(item => item.SomeProperty) 
   .Select(group => new List<T>(group)) 
   .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
3  
This is nice, but quite different from what the original asker was asking for. –  David B Jun 27 '11 at 14:50

I wrote a Clump extension method several years ago. Works great, and is the fastest implementation here. :P

/// <summary>
/// Clumps items into same size lots.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
/// <param name="source">The source list of items.</param>
/// <param name="size">The maximum size of the clumps to make.</param>
/// <returns>A list of list of items, where each list of items is no bigger than the size given.</returns>
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Clump<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (size < 1)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("size", "size must be greater than 0");

    return ClumpIterator<T>(source, size);
}

private static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ClumpIterator<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
{
    Debug.Assert(source != null, "source is null.");

    T[] items = new T[size];
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        items[count] = item;
        count++;

        if (count == size)
        {
            yield return items;
            items = new T[size];
            count = 0;
        }
    }
    if (count > 0)
    {
        if (count == size)
            yield return items;
        else
        {
            T[] tempItems = new T[count];
            Array.Copy(items, tempItems, count);
            yield return tempItems;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it should work but it is buffering 100% of the chunks, I was trying to avoid that ... but it turns out to be incredibly hairy. –  Sam Saffron May 3 '12 at 7:03
    
@SamSaffron Yep. Especially if you throw things like plinq into the mix, which is what my implementation was originally for. –  Cameron MacFarland May 3 '12 at 7:06
    
expanded my answer, let me know what you think –  Sam Saffron May 5 '12 at 0:59
    
@CameronMacFarland - can you explain why the second check for count == size is necessary? Thanks. –  dugas Sep 26 '13 at 18:44

Using modular partitioning:

public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<string>> Split(IEnumerable<string> input, int chunkSize)
{
    var chunks = (int)Math.Ceiling((double)input.Count() / (double)chunkSize);
    return Enumerable.Range(0, chunks).Select(id => input.Where(s => s.GetHashCode() % chunks == id));
}
share|improve this answer

This is an old question but this is what I ended up with; it enumerates the enumerable only once, but does create lists for each of the partitions. It doesn't suffer from unexpected behavior when ToArray() is called as some of the implementations do:

    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int chunkSize)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        }

        if (chunkSize < 1)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Invalid chunkSize: " + chunkSize);
        }

        using (IEnumerator<T> sourceEnumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            IList<T> currentChunk = new List<T>();
            while (sourceEnumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                currentChunk.Add(sourceEnumerator.Current);
                if (currentChunk.Count == chunkSize)
                {
                    yield return currentChunk;
                    currentChunk = new List<T>();
                }
            }

            if (currentChunk.Any())
            {
                yield return currentChunk;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Would be good to convert this into a Extension method: public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunkSize) –  krizzzn Jun 24 at 14:30
    
+1 for your answer. However i recommend two things 1. use foreach instead of while and using block. 2. Pass chunkSize in the constructor of List so that list knows its maximum expected size. –  Usman Zafar Jul 21 at 7:26

I think the following suggestion would be the fastest. I am sacrificing the lazyness of the source Enumerable for the ability to use Array.Copy and knowing ahead of the time the length of each of my sublists.

public static IEnumerable<T[]> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int size)
{
    T[] array = items as T[] ?? items.ToArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i+=size)
    {
        T[] chunk = new T[Math.Min(size, array.Length - i)];
        Array.Copy(array, i, chunk, 0, chunk.Length);
        yield return chunk;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

What about this one?

var input = new List<string> { "a", "g", "e", "w", "p", "s", "q", "f", "x", "y", "i", "m", "c" };
var k = 3

var res = Enumerable.Range(0, (input.Count - 1) / k + 1)
                    .Select(i => input.GetRange(i * k, Math.Min(k, input.Count - i * k)))
                    .ToList();

As far as I know, GetRange() is linear in terms of number of items taken. So this should perform well.

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