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I notice that many (most?) people when working with Zend Framework add decorators and labels in the Form class itself.

class User_Form_Add extends Zend_Form
{
    public function init()
    {
        parent::init();
        $username = new Zend_Form_Element_Text('username');
        $username->setLabel('Username:')
                 ->setRequired(true)
                 ->addFilter('StringTrim')
                 ->addValidator('StringLength', $breakChainOnFailure = false, $options = array(1, 30))
                 ->setDecorators(array(
                     'ViewHelper',
                     array('Description', array('tag' => 'p', 'class' => 'description')),
                     array('Label',       array('requiredPrefix'      => '<span class="asterisk">*</span>&nbsp;', 'escape' => false)),
                     array('HtmlTag',     array('tag' => 'p', 'class' => 'element'))
                 ));
    }
}

But surely this is not good practice? I would have thought that decorators and labels are part of the view layer in an MVC application. When I look at this form class, it looks "poluted" with all sorts of markup, tags and text that should be in the view layer.

This approach means that if you need to fiddle with the markup of your form, you need to work with both the form class and the viewscript.

I don't like that concept, and so have been separating the forms and decorators into the actual view scripts when I am rendering the forms. I want to keep these conflicting "concerns" of my application separate.

class User_Form_Add extends Zend_Form
{
    public function init()
    {
        parent::init();
        $username = new Zend_Form_Element_Text('username');
        $username->setRequired(true)
                 ->addFilter('StringTrim')
                 ->addValidator('StringLength', $breakChainOnFailure = false, $options = array(1, 30));
    }
}

//add.phtml:

$this->form->username->setLabel('Username:');
$this->form->username->setDecorators(array(
    'ViewHelper',
    array('Description', array('tag' => 'p', 'class' => 'description')),
    array('Label',       array('requiredPrefix'      => '<span class="asterisk">*</span>&nbsp;', 'escape' => false)),
    array('HtmlTag',     array('tag' => 'p', 'class' => 'element'))
));

echo $this->form->render();

This leaves the form class clean, and quite analogous to a model class - that's how I percieve the form class to be; It contains filters, validators etc, which are all business-logic related.

If you then follow this approach, it makes it easier to integrate your forms with your models, such that you can reuse/access the form validators and filters directly from within your models - without the overhead of having created decorators and whatnot unnessesarily.

http://weierophinney.net/matthew/archives/200-Using-Zend_Form-in-Your-Models.html

As far as keeping your view scripts DRY, such that you're not repeating the same labels and decorators in multiple views (i.e. when you need to render the same form multiple times, but in different view scripts), I find you can separate re-usable parts of a form out using the ViewScript decorator to keep things DRY.

EDIT: As well, we can also override the default decorators with ones appropriate to our project to avoid having to unnessesarily declare decorators in the first place.

So my actual question is this:

Why isn't anyone else working with their forms like this? What drawbacks do you see for this approach?

Why should decorators and form labels be created in the form class, if I can just as easily add them in the view layer?

I don't get why nearly every usage of Zend_Form I see includes adding decorators/labels in the form class itself.

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4 Answers 4

Why isn't anyone else working with their forms like this?

I never thought of. Very good approach.

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To answer your question as to why you don't see people doing this is because this simply is not good practice. A form should encapsulate your entire form logic basically a module/widget...what you have just done is split your form up where you now have to worry about your labels in the view. This should all be in your form that's why you can set the labels, decorators etc.. all in the form.

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I've been using this approach now for some time, and it's working great. I do believe that this is a better way to seperate concerns. Think about it - you are tightly coupling presentation logic (decorators/labels) with business logic (the form itself which is more akin to a model, i.e. with the validators) How then can you re-use forms, but have different decorators? Maybe you have a form that you want to decorate differently on a mobile version of a site? There is lots of reasons, but I'm convinced now that tightly coupling presentation with a form is not necessary. –  asgeo1 Jan 25 '12 at 22:18
    
But, I can be convinced that this a bad idea - hence why I posted the question in the first place. So... do you have any objective reasons why not splitting the form up is a better way to do things? –  asgeo1 Jan 25 '12 at 22:26

I typically declare my decorators and such in a class in a custom library for the project or in a view helper that I can then call in on each form and still have all the decorators in one location to reduce the amount of code needed for them.

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I think the major reason why "anyone else isn't working with their forms like this" is because, for the most part, a site will only use one or two 'default' decorators. If you are going to decorate the inputs the same way 90% (perhaps less) of the time, why bother declaring it in every view script?

Like gokujou's answer, I too will create a custom decorator class in my library. See Creating Custom Form Markup Using Zend_Form_Decorator

I do like your approach, but I think it's most appropriate for instances where you have a deviation from the standard decorator(s). If I'm using the same decorators the majority of time, I don't want to have to bother with declaring it in my view script.

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I think we're on the same page. I wasn't clear, but my question is about the exceptions to the default decorators. Like you, I will define my default decorators in a central spot. Currently I'm doing this in a base form class, because there is a loadDefaultDecorators() method you can override. I would prefer if there was a way to set the default decorators in a layout script however. –  asgeo1 Nov 16 '10 at 2:19
    
@asgeo1, "I would prefer if there was a way to set the defaults up in a layout script instead however." - Certainly your example works? The question wasn't "Why isn't this possible?" it was "Why isn't everyone else doing this?" –  Fatmuemoo Nov 16 '10 at 2:26
    
Sorry, I'm confusing you more. When I say I would prefer if there was a way to set the defaults up in a layout script instead however - I'm just complaining about the default decorators in general. My actual question is about the non-default decorators. I'm genuinely confused why most people would create them in a Form class as opposed to a view script. –  asgeo1 Nov 16 '10 at 2:50

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