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I need to create a multi-edit form in rails, like so:

<form>
<input type='text' name='input1'></input>
<input type='text' name='input2'></input>
<input type='text' name='input3'></input>
<input type='text' name='input4'></input>
<input type='text' name='input5'></input>
<br>
<input type='text' name='input1'></input>
<input type='text' name='input2'></input>
<input type='text' name='input3'></input>
<input type='text' name='input4'></input>
<input type='text' name='input5'></input>
<br>
<input type='text' name='input1'></input>
<input type='text' name='input2'></input>
<input type='text' name='input3'></input>
<input type='text' name='input4'></input>
<input type='text' name='input5'></input>
<br>

... and so on, then the "<submit>" button will be at the very end. One click of the submit button at the end should collect all the values and parse them in the controller.

I just need to know how to generate the multi-edit form in the view. Also, each row is unique; I'd also need to know how to assign a unique identifier to each of the input tags I guess; I do have a unique ID value I could use.

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1 Answer 1

This is trivial to accomplish, but we need more information. How are these fields related to your models? Is this one model with many fields, many instances of a model or something else?


What you want to do in this situation is use a form builder. It will generate input fields according to a naming convention that will be parsed into a much more useful format when it gets to the controller. Since I have no information about your models, I will use a hypothetical example:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :title, :body, :author, :published_at
end

Create the form using the form_for helper. It will give you a formbuilder object to create the input fields.

<% form_for :post do |f| -%>
  <p>
    <%= f.label :title %>
    <%= f.text_field :title %>
  </p>
  <p>
    <%= f.label :body %>
    <%= f.text_area :body %>
  </p>
  <p>
    <%= f.label :author %>
    <%= f.text_field :author %>
  </p>
  <p>
    <%= f.label :published_at %>
    <%= f.datetime_select :published_at %>
  </p>
<% end -%>

The key benefit of using helpers is the name attribute of the inputs it generates. Since body belongs to a form for post it will be given the name attribute post[body]. These attributes will be parsed into the following hash:

:post => {
  :title => "This is the title",
  :body => "this is the body",
  :author => "John Doe",
  :published_at => "Mon Nov 15 2010 19:23:40 GMT-0600 (CST)"
}

This means you don't need to manually copy fields into a model. You can just pass it directly to the Model#new method:

@post = Post.new(params[:post])

and then do your validation checks. This convention becomes indispensable when you start nesting models inside one another.

See here for a more thorough guide to form helpers.

share|improve this answer
    
one model with many fields. –  James Nine Nov 16 '10 at 1:00

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