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In the interest of eliminating as many nested queries as possible, I'm trying to optimize the following query:

   SELECT fp.id, 
          fp.user_id, 
          COUNT(c.id) AS num_replies, 
          c2.created AS latest_activity_time, c2.user_id AS latest_activity_user_id
     FROM forum_posts fp
LEFT JOIN comments c ON c.object_id = fp.id
LEFT JOIN (SELECT created, user_id
             FROM comments 
         ORDER BY created DESC 
            LIMIT 1) AS c2 ON fp.id = c2.object_id
    WHERE fp.deleted != 1
 GROUP BY fp.id

Sorry if you find any errors...I tried whittling this query down to only the relevant parts and I might have made a mistake somewhere in the process

So basically, what we have here is a table of forum posts and a table of comment replies to those posts. Each forum post can have multiple replies. The first join is used for counting the total number of replies, and the second join is used to get the most recent reply's information. What I get back from this query is something like this:

sample nested query results

So, I'm basically trying to figure out how I can do this without having to resort to this nested query. Any help you guys can provide would be extremely useful.

Thanks!

Edit: I've adjusted the query slightly to reflect the fact that I need to pull back not just the latest_activity_time, but also the latest_activity_user_id. Sorry for the confusion!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use:

   SELECT fp.id,
          fp.user_id,
          COUNT(a.id) AS num_replies,
          c.date AS latest_activity_time,
          c.user_id AS latest_activity_user_id
     FROM FORUM_POSTS fp
LEFT JOIN COMMENTS a ON a.object_id = fp.id         
LEFT JOIN (SELECT x.object_id,
                  x.date, 
                  x.user_id
             FROM COMMENTS x
             JOIN (SELECT t.object_id,
                          MAX(t.date) AS max_date
                     FROM COMMENTS t
                 GROUP BY t.object_id) y ON y.object_id = x.object_id
                                        AND y.max_date = x.date) b ON b.object_id = fp.id
    WHERE fp.deleted != 1
 GROUP BY fp.id
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, @OMG Ponies. I realize now that in my effort to whittle down the query, I took out the most important bit: that I need to grab not only the latest_activity_time, but also the user_id and username for that latest activity. Is there a way to do this using MAX(c.date) in the field selections? –  treeface Nov 16 '10 at 1:42
    
@OMG Ponies: Sorry for the delay. I've adjusted my original question with (hopefully) a more accurate version of the original query. To answer your question directly: yes, the comments table has its own user_id column. –  treeface Nov 16 '10 at 2:07
    
@treeface: See update –  OMG Ponies Nov 16 '10 at 2:15
    
@OMG Ponies: Thank you, again, for the time that you've put into this. I'm sorry to report that this doesn't appear to work as expected. Using this JOIN does cause the latest_activity_time to come up properly for those posts that have comments, but it eliminates the posts without any comments and it causes the num_replies to always be 1. –  treeface Nov 16 '10 at 18:43
2  
@treeface: just a preternatural distaste for the LIMIT clause =) –  OMG Ponies Nov 16 '10 at 21:44

As you are using MySQL, you should be able to get away with the following:

   SELECT fp.id, 
          fp.user_id, 
          COUNT(c.id) AS num_replies, 
          c.created AS latest_activity_time, 
          c.user_id AS latest_activity_user_id
     FROM forum_posts fp
LEFT JOIN comments c ON c.object_id = fp.id
    WHERE fp.deleted != 1
 GROUP BY fp.id
 ORDER BY fp.id, c.created
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, but this doesn't create the intended result. The comments table is still sorting by the default ID column. –  treeface Nov 16 '10 at 18:45

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