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I'm a student & i looked up this function in a book. It works as it should but i don't quite understand the inner workings of the sortFunction() which is passed to the qsort() function. If some one could explain it in detail, please do. Thanks in advance.

#include<iostream>
#include<stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

//form of sort function required by qsort()
int sortFunction(const void *intOne,const void *intTwo);

const int tableSize = 10;

int main()
{
    int i, table[tableSize];

    //fill the table with values
    for(i=0;i<tableSize;i++)
    {
        cout<<"Enter value "<<(i+1)<<" : ";
        cin>>table[i];
    }
    cout<<"\n";

    //sort values
    qsort((void*)table,tableSize,sizeof(table[0]),sortFunction);

    //print the results
    for(i=0;i<tableSize;i++)
    {
        cout<<"Value "<<(i+1)<<" : "<<table[i]<<endl;
    }

    cout<<"\nDone\n";

    return 0;
}

int sortFunction(const void *a,const void *b)
{
    int intOne = *((int*)a);
    int intTwo = *((int*)b);

    if(intOne<intTwo)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    if(intOne==intTwo)
    {
        return 0;
    }

    return 1;

}
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qsort is a C function. C++ offers the far superior std::sort which you should use instead. –  jalf Nov 16 '10 at 5:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you look at the actual call to qsort...

qsort((void*)table,tableSize,sizeof(table[0]),sortFunction); 

...you'll see it provides a void* address and size of the entire data array to be sorted, then the size of one data element in that array, then a pointer to the comparison function "sortFunction". There's nothing in there that allows qsort() to know what the type of the element is - how the individual bits in any single data element are used to represent some data, so there's no way it can meaningfully compare two such elements. When you supply...

int sortFunction(const void *a,const void *b)   
{   
    int intOne = *((int*)a);   
    int intTwo = *((int*)b);   

...you're taking two pointers - they're to memory addresses but when qsort calls sortFunction those void pointers carry still tell you nothing about the data elements, as qsort() had no insight itself. The last two lines above are where you - the programmer coordinating the qsort call - reapply the knowledge you've had all along about what the data elements are: in this care, they're ints, so you cast each void* to an int* (using (int*)a), then dereference that int* to get the int at memory address a. Similarly for b. You've recovered the two numbers that were there as numbers. Then, the job of sortFunction is to indicate how they should be ordered when sorting finishes. If a should be first, return a negative value (e.g. -1); if they're equivalent, return 0; and if b should be first, return a positive value (e.g. 1). qsort() receives that information and uses it to work out how to shuffle the data elements around as it sorts.

FWIW, C lets you express that a bit more succinctly as...

return intOne < intTwo ? -1 :
       intOne == intTwo ? 0 :
       1;

...or, if you're sure the difference of two numbers can never be less than INT_MIN, then the following is sure not to wrap around to a big number inappropriately...

return intOne - intTwo;
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Thanks a lot, it's very helpful. I was hoping for a detailed answer like this. Thanks again. –  Ramila Nov 16 '10 at 7:49
    
@Ramila: you're welcome. –  Tony D Nov 16 '10 at 7:55

sortFunction isn't actually doing the sorting, it is being used as a comparison function to determine whether one element should precede another in the sorted list.

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Thanks for the answer. –  Ramila Nov 16 '10 at 7:52

What you called 'sortFunction' is normally called a comparator. It basically tells the generic sort code in qsort() whether two elements in the array being sorted compare equal (0), or whether the first argument sorts before the second (<0) or the first argument sorts after the second (>0).

With that information, plus the size of each row, plus the number of rows in the array and the start of the array, the qsort() function can order the data correctly.

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Thanks, i appreciate it. –  Ramila Nov 16 '10 at 7:51

As you can see in documentation, qsort function takes a comparator as it's last parameter. This function is used to actually compare parameters (tell which one should go first in a sorted array).

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2  
The comparator must return a tri-state value (negative, zero, positive), but the comparisons you refer to return a boolean. They should not be used with qsort(), therefore. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 16 '10 at 2:27
    
Man, I suck. Of course they can be only used with sort, thanks for pointing it out! –  Marek Sapota Nov 16 '10 at 2:29
    
Thanks for the answer. –  Ramila Nov 16 '10 at 7:50

See if this article helps. It talks about how call back functions are used and how functions like qsort can be implemented using callback functions. http://learnwithtechies.com/index.php/component/content/article/4-c/18-callback-functions-in-c-can-be-very-handy

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