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I'm working with several functions which need to pass a variable back and forth. Should I use a global variable or another method instead? I would also appreciate an example or two on how to implement it.

Thanks, Elliot Bonneville

Psuedocode of my functions:

function GetXML() {//this would be a function which reads in an XML file.
                  //Preferably it would also generate or set an object to hold the XML data.
}

function UseXMLData() { //I would use the XML data here.
}

function UseXMLDataHereAsWell() { //And here as well.
}
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2  
Can you post an example of the kind of functions you're talking about? –  casablanca Nov 16 '10 at 2:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best solution for what you're trying to do would be to wrap all your data into an object and make your functions be methods on the object:

function MyXMLClass() {
  this.data = null;
}

MyXMLClass.prototype = {
  GetXML: function() {
    this.data = ...;
  },

  UseXMLData: function() {
    // use this.data
  },

  /* etc. */
};

And then you can just use it like this:

var x = new MyXMLClass();
x.GetXML();
x.UseXMLData();
...
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Couldn't I just use MyXMLClass = new Object? (not sure if that is the correct syntax) –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 16 '10 at 3:11
1  
@Elliot Bonneville: If you don't need a class but only one object of that type, yes, you can do it this way: var MyXMLObject = { data: null, GetXML: function() { ... }, /* etc. */ }; –  casablanca Nov 16 '10 at 23:45
    
Ah, thanks, that's really helpful. ;) –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 17 '10 at 23:01

Global variables are, as you probably guessed, considered bad. Any other code on the page can modify them - often because another programmer accidentally picks the same name. You can try to mitigate this effect by choosing really strange names, but then you get a bunch of really strange names.

There are a lot of ways to minimize the number of global variables you create in JavaScript. One way is to store all your variables under a single object - that's what jQuery does (Technically jQuery uses two - $ and jQuery.)

If you know what you're doing, you often don't have to create any global variables - just wrap all your code in a function that you invoke immediately.

Bad example - pollutes the global namespace unnecessarily:

var appleCount = 0;

function addApple() {
  appleCount = appleCount + 1;
}

function howManyApples() {
  return appleCount;
}

addApple();
alert(howManyApples());

Better example - only creates one global variable:

var appleCounter = {
  count: 0,
  add: function() {
    this.count = this.count + 1;
  },
  howMany: function() {
    return this.count;
  }
};

appleCounter.add();
alert(appleCounter.howMany());

Best example - creates no global variables:

(function(){
  var appleCounter = {
    count: 0,
    add: function() {
      this.count = this.count + 1;
    },
    howMany: function() {
      return this.count;
    }
  };

  appleCounter.add();
  alert(appleCounter.howMany());
})();
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Global variables should be avoided in reusable scripts.

If you're writing simple functions that will only be used in one page, there's nothing wrong with using globals.

If you're writing a reusable component or a complex web page, you should use closures or namespaces instead.

For more specific advice, please provide more detail.

EDIT: You should create an XmlData class.

For example:

function XmlData(...) { 
    this.data = ...;
}
XmlData.prototype.doSomething = function(...) { 
    //Use this.data
}

Depending on how what your data comes from, you may want to make a separate function to retrieve the data.

Here is a good explanation.

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I am working with a reusable script, so what would I do instead? –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 16 '10 at 2:54
    
It depends what you're doing. –  SLaks Nov 16 '10 at 2:54
    
Ok, let me post an example. Hang on. –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 16 '10 at 2:58

Create a namespace, put all your functions within that namespace.

MyNS = {
    x: 1, y: 2 // Here you define shared variables
};

MyNS.func1 = function(){}; // Here you define your functions that need those variables
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This may work. Let me investigate further. –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 16 '10 at 3:04

Avoid global variables, it's bad programming. Try pass it as an argument or use name spacing to restrict its scope.

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So I've heard. What would I do instead, and how would I implement it? –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 16 '10 at 2:54

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