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What's way to solve it?

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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It depends which version of the .NET Framework you are using. .NET 4.0 makes thread management a whole lot easier using Tasks:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Task task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => doStuff());
        Task task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => doStuff());
        Task task3 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => doStuff());
        Task.WaitAll(task1, task2, task3);
                Console.WriteLine("All threads complete");
    }

    static void doStuff()
    {
        //do stuff here
    }
}

In previous versions of .NET you could use the BackgroundWorker object, use ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(), or create your threads manually and use Thread.Join() to wait for them to complete:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Thread t1 = new Thread(doStuff);
    t1.Start();
    Thread t2 = new Thread(doStuff);
    t2.Start();
    Thread t3 = new Thread(doStuff);
    t3.Start();
    t1.Join();
    t2.Join();
    t3.Join();
    Console.WriteLine("All threads complete");
}
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The Task API is by far the cleanest solution. –  JefClaes Dec 7 '11 at 7:49
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In .Net 4.0, you can use the Task Parallel Library.

In earlier versions, you can create a list of Thread objects in a loop, calling Start on each one, then make another loop and call Join on each one.

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why need another loop? –  user496949 Nov 16 '10 at 8:32
    
@user: If you call Join right after starting the thread, you'll end up waiting for it to finish before starting any other threads. You need to start all of the threads, then Join all of them. –  SLaks Nov 16 '10 at 13:32
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I think you need WaitHandler.WaitAll. Here is an example:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int numOfThreads = 10;
    WaitHandle[] waitHandles = new WaitHandle[numOfThreads];

    for (int i = 0; i < numOfThreads; i++)
    {
        var j = i;
        // Or you can use AutoResetEvent/ManualResetEvent
        var handle = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset);
        var thread = new Thread(() =>
                                {
                                    Thread.Sleep(j * 1000);
                                    Console.WriteLine("Thread{0} exits", j);
                                    handle.Set();
                                });
        waitHandles[j] = handle;
        thread.Start();
    }
    WaitHandle.WaitAll(waitHandles);
    Console.WriteLine("Main thread exits");
    Console.Read();
}
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@Kirk: I was going to add an example just now but had to go to a meeting. –  Danny Chen Nov 16 '10 at 4:21
    
nice! +1 (and deleted comment) –  Kirk Woll Nov 17 '10 at 17:43
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Don't know if there is a better way, but following describes how I did it with a counter and background worker thread.

private object _lock=new object();
private int _runningThreads = 0;

private int Counter{
    get{
           lock(_lock) 
               return _runningThreads;
    }
    set{ 
           lock(_lock) 
               _runningThreads = value;
    }
}

Now whenever you create a worker thread, increment the counter:

var t=new BackgroundWorker();
//ADD RunWorkerCompleted HANDLER
//START THREAD
Counter++;

In work completed, decrement the counter:

private void RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    Counter--;
}

Now you can check for the counter anytime to see if any thread is running:

if(Couonter>0){
    //SOME THREAD IS YET TO FINISH.
}
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1  
You don't need a lock. In fact, since you only write the property form the UI thread, you don't need anything. –  SLaks Nov 16 '10 at 3:38
1  
I may be mistaken, but I think the lock is correct; he is decrementing the counter in an event handler that is fired when each worker completes. –  Mark Avenius Nov 16 '10 at 3:48
2  
@Mark: The Completed event is always fired on the UI thread. Also, the lock won't have any effect; Int32 read and writes are atomic. Had there been thread issues, the lock wouldn't help; he'd need to call Interlocked.Increment. –  SLaks Nov 16 '10 at 3:50
    
The lock won't work for Counter-- as the counter is unprotected between the get/set. –  Greg Sansom Nov 16 '10 at 3:52
    
@Greg: Exactly. Multi-threading is hard. Slapping a lock in each member isn't nearly enough. –  SLaks Nov 16 '10 at 4:04
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I've made a very simple extension method to wait all threads of a collection:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
namespace Extensions
{
    public static class ThreadExtension
    {
        public static void WaitAll(this IEnumerable<Thread> threads)
        {
            if(threads!=null)
            {
                foreach(Thread thread in threads)
                { thread.Join(); }
            }
        }
    }
}

Then you simply call:

List<Thread> threads=new List<Thread>();
//Add your threads to this collection
threads.WaitAll();
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