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Looking at a "mysqldump -d" and see a key that is KEY, not "PRIMARY KEY" or "FOREIGN KEY"

What is KEY?

Example:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `TABLE_001` (
  `COL_001` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_002` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_003` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_004` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_005` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_006` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_007` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_008` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_009` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_010` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_011` int(256) NOT NULL,
  `COL_012` int(256) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`COL_001`),
  KEY `COL_002` (`COL_002`,`COL_003`),
  KEY `COL_012` (`COL_012`),
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

Also, when I'm create a new version of this table, will changing MyISAM to InnoDB require any additional changes besides "ENGINE=MyISAM" to "ENGINE=InnoDB"?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

KEY is alternative syntax for index declaration. The CREATE TABLE statement includes creating two indexes, on COL_002 and COL_012 separately.

...when I'm create a new version of this table, will changing MyISAM to InnoDB require any additional changes besides "ENGINE=MyISAM" to "ENGINE=InnoDB"?

No, that should be fine but be aware that you can't use MySQL's native Full Text Search (FTS) on tables using the Innodb engine -- they have to be MyISAM before you can full text index columns in them.

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Yeah, the DB doesn't need FTS, but it does need FK's added, which is only supported by InnoDB. So, no idea what INDEX really does, is that only for FTS? If so, really odd that is in the DB, must be a syntax error. –  blunders Nov 16 '10 at 4:50
1  
@blunders: An index helps data retrieval & comparison, but slows down INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE. They also have to be maintained. FTS indexes are separate from indexes. –  OMG Ponies Nov 16 '10 at 4:52
    
+2, selecting you as the answer too, thanks for the additional info. Cheers! –  blunders Nov 16 '10 at 4:57

From MySQL manual for CREATE TABLE syntax:

KEY is normally a synonym for INDEX.

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1  
+1 Thank you! –  blunders Nov 16 '10 at 4:43

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