Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my text file forms.

S1,F2  title including several white spaces  (abbr) single,Here<->There,reply
S1,F2  title including several white spaces  (abbr) single,Here<->There
S1,F2  title including several white spaces  (abbr) single,Here<->There,[reply]

How to change my reg ex to work on all the three forms above?

/^S(\d),F(\d)\s+(.*?)\((.*?)\)\s+(.*?),(.*?)[,](.*?)$/

I tried replace (.*?)$/ with [.*?]$/. It doesn't work. I guess I shouldn't use [](square brackets) to match the possible word of [reply](including the []).

Actually, my general question should be how to match the possible characters better in Reg exp using Perl? I looked up the online PerlDoc webpages. But it is hard for me to find out the useful information based on my Perl knowledge level. That's why I also asked some stupid questions.

Appreciated for your comments and suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
See perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html for details. –  reinierpost Nov 16 '10 at 8:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about using negated character classes:

 /^S(\d),F(\d)\s+([^()]*?)\s+\(([^()]+)\)\s+([^,]*),([^,]*)(?:,(.*?))?$/

When incorporated into this script:

#!/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
while (<>)
{
    chomp;
    my($s,$f,$title,$abbr,$single,$here,$reply) =
        $_ =~ m/^S(\d),F(\d)\s+([^()]*?)\s+\(([^()]+)\)\s+([^,]*),([^,]*)(?:,(.*?))?$/;
    $reply ||= "<no reply>";
    print "S$s F$f <$title> ($abbr) $single : $here : $reply\n";
}

And run on the original data file, it produces:

S1 F2 <title including several white spaces> (abbr) single : Here<->There : reply
S1 F2 <title including several white spaces> (abbr) single : Here<->There : <no reply>
S1 F2 <title including several white spaces> (abbr) single : Here<->There : [reply]

You should probably also use the 'xms' suffix to the expression to allow you to document it more easily:

#!/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>)
{
    chomp;

    my($s,$f,$title,$abbr,$single,$here,$reply) =
        $_ =~ m/^
                S(\d) ,             # S1
                F(\d) \s+           # F2
                ([^()]*?) \s+       # Title
                \(([^()]+)\) \s+    # (abbreviation)
                ([^,]*) ,           # Single
                ([^,]*)             # Here or There
                (?: , (.*?) )?      # Optional reply
                $
               /xms;

    $reply ||= "<no reply>";
    print "S$s F$f <$title> ($abbr) $single : $here : $reply\n";
}

I confess I'm still apt to write one-line monsters - I'm trying to mend my ways.

share|improve this answer

You know that brackets in regular expression are reserved for declaring sets of characters that you want to match? So, for a real bracket, you need to escape it, or to enclose it in brackets ([[] or []]), isn't that obfuscated?!.

Try (\[.*?\]|.*?) to indicate that optional brackets.

share|improve this answer

Try

/^S(\d),F(\d)\s+(.*?)\((.*?)\)\s+(.*?),(.*?)(,(\[reply\]|reply))?$/

This will match the optional (?) part ,(\[reply\]|reply) which is either ,[reply] or ,reply, i.e.,

  • (nothing)
  • ,reply
  • [,reply]

BTW, your [,] means "one character of the following: ,". Exactly the same as a literal , within the regex. If you wanted to make your [,](.*?)$ work, you should use (,(.+))?$ to match either nothing or a comma followed by any (non-empty) string.


EDIT

If the following are also valid:

S1,F2  title including several white spaces  (abbr) single,Here<->There,[reply
S1,F2  title including several white spaces  (abbr) single,Here<->There,reply]

Then you could use (,\[?reply\]?)? at the end.

share|improve this answer

You can make the last part optional by using the (?:..)? as:

^S(\d),F(\d)\s+(.*?)\((.*?)\)\s+(.*?),(.*?)(?:,(.*))?$

Codepad link

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.