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  1. Why do I get this error message? "WaitAll for multiple handles on a STA thread is not supported."
  2. Should I use [MTAThreadAttribute] attribut? Update: Dosn't work with WPF applications!

Note: It error is at line WaitHandle.WaitAll(doneEvents); I'm using a standard WPF project.

private void Search()
{
    const int CPUs = 2;
    var doneEvents = new ManualResetEvent[CPUs];

    // Configure and launch threads using ThreadPool:
    for (int i = 0; i < CPUs; i++)
    {
        doneEvents[i] = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        var f = new Indexer(Paths[i], doneEvents[i]);
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(f.WaitCallBack, i);
    }

    // Wait for all threads in pool 
    WaitHandle.WaitAll(doneEvents);
    Debug.WriteLine("Search completed!");
}

Update: The following solution doesn’t work for WPF applications! It is not possible to change the main application attribute to MTAThreadAttribute. It will result in the following error:

Error: "WaitAll for multiple handles on a STA thread is not supported."

share|improve this question
    
You realize that you app will freeze completely until those Indexers are done? –  liggett78 Nov 16 '10 at 10:08
    
Yes! I know that. But as it is it doesn’t run. –  Amir Rezaei Nov 16 '10 at 10:28
1  
    
The same error but the solution doesn't for WPF applications! You can’t change main method attribute for WPF application. –  Amir Rezaei Nov 16 '10 at 11:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

What about using the Tasks to do your threading for you.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.tasks.task.aspx

var task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomeWork());
var task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomeWork());
var task3 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomeWork());
Task.WaitAll(task1, task2, task3);
share|improve this answer
4  
It's .NET Framework 4. So I have to upgrade the project. It's seems to be a better approach thought! –  Amir Rezaei Nov 16 '10 at 12:27
1  
Task.Run(()=>DoSomeWork()) is a better alternative –  gldraphael Feb 18 at 20:23

Actually I use the following to replace WaitHandle.WaitAll(doneEvents);

foreach (var e in doneEvents)
    e.WaitOne();
share|improve this answer
    
are there any downsides to using this alternative? –  invertigo Oct 27 '14 at 21:23
2  
I've seen none, but I would recommend using Task for brand new code –  Calimero100582 Nov 6 '14 at 16:51

Use one ManualResetEvent and wait on it. Also maintain a TaskCount variable that is set to the number of worker threads you start, use Interlocked.Decrement in the worker thread code as the very last action of the worker and signal the event if the counter reaches zero,e.g.

// other worker actions...
if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref taskCount) == 0)
   doneEvent.Set();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks it seems to be the only solution since WaitAll(..) doesn’t work. –  Amir Rezaei Nov 16 '10 at 12:15
    
Yep, that would work. Just make sure to treat the main thread as if it were a work item and initialize taskCount = 1 and do the Decrement and Set at the end of the for loop. –  Brian Gideon Nov 16 '10 at 14:05

I would refactor your code to use the CountdownEvent class instead.

private void Search() 
{ 
    const int CPUs = 2; 
    var done = new CountdownEvent(1);

    // Configure and launch threads using ThreadPool: 
    for (int i = 0; i < CPUs; i++) 
    { 
        done.AddCount();
        var f = new Indexer(Paths[i], doneEvents[i]); 
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
          (state) =>
          {
            try
            {
              f.WaitCallBack(state);
            }
            finally
            {
              done.Signal();
            }
          }, i); 
    } 

    // Wait for all threads in pool  
    done.Signal();
    done.Wait();
    Debug.WriteLine("Search completed!"); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
NB: .NET 4 only –  Mark Sowul May 15 '13 at 21:33

use something like this:

foreach (ITask Task in Tasks)
{
    Task.WaitHandle = CompletedEvent;
    new Thread(Task.Run).Start();
}

int TasksCount = Tasks.Count;
for (int i = 0; i < TasksCount; i++)
    CompletedEvent.WaitOne();

if (AllCompleted != null)
    AllCompleted(this, EventArgs.Empty);
share|improve this answer
1  
CompletedEvent is of type System.Threading.AutoResetEvent –  CSharper Jan 16 '12 at 10:51
    
-1 While cleaner, for me this is not sufficiently different to stackoverflow.com/a/4194938/11635 –  Ruben Bartelink Feb 19 '14 at 10:03

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