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I'm having a problem with my work that hopefully reduces to the following: I have two List<int>s, and I want to see if any of the ints in ListA are equal to any int in ListB. (They can be arrays if that makes life easier, but I think List<> has some built-in magic that might help.) And I'm sure this is a LINQ-friendly problem, but I'm working in 2.0 here.

My solution so far has been to foreach through ListA, and then foreach through ListB,

foreach (int a in ListA)
{
    foreach (int b in ListB)
    {
        if (a == b)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}

which was actually pretty slick when they were each three items long, but now they're 200 long and they frequently don't match, so we get the worst-case of N^2 comparisons. Even 40,000 comparisons go by pretty fast, but I think I might be missing something, since N^2 seems pretty naive for this particular problem.

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

With LINQ, this is trivial, as you can call the Intersect extension method on the Enumerable class to give you the set intersection of the two arrays:

var intersection = ListA.Intersect(ListB);

However, this is the set intersection, meaning if ListA and ListB don't have unique values in it, you won't get any copies. In other words if you have the following:

var ListA = new [] { 0, 0, 1, 2, 3 };
var ListB = new [] { 0, 0, 0, 2 };

Then ListA.Intersect(ListB) produces:

{ 0, 2 }

If you're expecting:

{ 0, 0, 2 }

Then you're going to have to maintain a count of the items yourself and yield/decrement as you scan the two lists.

First, you'd want to collect a Dictionary<TKey, int> with the lists of the individual items:

var countsOfA = ListA.GroupBy(i => i).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());

From there, you can scan ListB and place that in a list when you come across an item in countsOfA:

// The items that match.
IList<int> matched = new List<int>();

// Scan 
foreach (int b in ListB)
{
    // The count.
    int count;

    // If the item is found in a.
    if (countsOfA.TryGetValue(b, out count))
    {
        // This is positive.
        Debug.Assert(count > 0);

        // Add the item to the list.
        matched.Add(b);

        // Decrement the count.  If
        // 0, remove.
        if (--count == 0) countsOfA.Remove(b);
    }
}

You can wrap this up in an extension method that defers execution like so:

public static IEnumerable<T> MultisetIntersect(this IEnumerable<T> first,
    IEnumerable<T> second, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    // Call the overload with the default comparer.
    return first.MultisetIntersect(second, EqualityComparer<T>.Default);
}

public static IEnumerable<T> MultisetIntersect(this IEnumerable<T> first,
    IEnumerable<T> second, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    // Validate parameters.  Do this separately so check
    // is performed immediately, and not when execution
    // takes place.
    if (first == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("first");
    if (second == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("second");
    if (comparer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");

    // Defer execution on the internal
    // instance.
    return first.MultisetIntersectImplementation(second, comparer);
}

private static IEnumerable<T> MultisetIntersectImplementation(
    this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second, 
    IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    Debug.Assert(first != null);
    Debug.Assert(second != null);
    Debug.Assert(comparer != null);

    // Get the dictionary of the first.
    IDictionary<T, long> counts = first.GroupBy(t => t, comparer).
        ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g.LongCount(), comparer);

    // Scan 
    foreach (T t in second)
    {
        // The count.
        long count;

        // If the item is found in a.
        if (counts.TryGetValue(t, out count))
        {
            // This is positive.
            Debug.Assert(count > 0);

            // Yield the item.
            yield return t;

            // Decrement the count.  If
            // 0, remove.
            if (--count == 0) counts.Remove(t);
        }
    }
}

Note that both of these approaches are (and I apologize if I'm butchering Big-O notation here) O(N + M) where N is the number of items in the first array, and M is the number of items in the second array. You have to scan each list only once, and it's assumed that getting the hash codes and performing lookups on the hash codes is an O(1) (constant) operation.

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Does Enumerable.Intersect take a similar approach? –  palswim Nov 27 '12 at 17:17
    
@palswim Slightly, but not exactly. I've updated my answer to reflect Intersect and I'll update with a more thorough answer which has the counts in a bit. –  casperOne Nov 27 '12 at 17:29
    
@palswim Updated the answer to reflect using Intersect as well as meeting expectations when using intersections on a set vs. a multiset. –  casperOne Nov 27 '12 at 17:48

Load the whole of ListA into a HashSet instance, and then test foreach item in ListB against the HastSet: I'm pretty sure that this would be O(N).

//untested code ahead
HashSet<int> hashSet = new HashSet<int>(ListA);
foreach (int i in ListB)
{
    if (hashSet.Contains(i))
        return true;
}

Here's the same thing in one line:

return new HashSet<int>(ListA).Overlaps(ListB);

HashSet doesn't exist in .NET 3.5, so in .NET 2.0 you can use Dictionary<int,object> (instead of using HashSet<int>), and always store null as the object/value in the Dictionary since you're only interested in the keys.

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Hashset was not introduced until .NET 3.5. –  casperOne Jan 7 '09 at 6:00
    
Hashing in general is not a bad idea. It's not difficult to implement one if necessary. –  PolyThinker Jan 7 '09 at 6:07
1  
In that case, using .Net 2.0, you can use Dictionary<int,object> instead of HashSet (and always store null as the object/value in the Dictionary, since you're only interested in the keys). –  ChrisW Jan 7 '09 at 6:08

Chris gives an O(N) solution by hashing. Now, depending on the constant factor (due to hashing), it might be worth considering an O(N log(N)) solution by sorting. There are a few different variants that you may consider depending on your use case.

  1. Sort ListB ( O(N log(N) ), and use a searching algorithm to parse each element in ListA (which is again O(N) * O(log(N))).

  2. Sort both ListA and ListB ( O(N log(N) ), and use an O(N) algorithm to compare these lists for duplicates.

If both lists are going to be used more than once, the second method is preferred.

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Instead of iterating through each list, take a look at the List.Contains method:

foreach (int a in ListA)
{
  if (ListB.Contains(a))
    return true;
}
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That's no better than the original solution: still O(N^2) –  ChrisW Jan 7 '09 at 5:58
    
Teach me to post just before bed... in looking at the Contains method in more depth, it does indeed perform an internal iteration of the list. In this case, a Dictionary object is probably the better route. –  Metro Smurf Jan 7 '09 at 6:06
    
That solves many things in a nice and simple way. Thanks. –  tanzer May 29 '14 at 10:15

How about using BinarySearch method instead of iterating over all elements in the inner loop?

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1  
Doesn't BinarySearch rely on the list being sorted? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w4e7fxsh.aspx –  Fabrizio C. Jan 7 '09 at 6:45

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