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What is the easiest way to create and save string into .txt files?

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6 Answers 6

Use TStringList.

uses
  Classes, Dialogs; // Classes for TStrings, Dialogs for ShowMessage

var
  Lines: TStrings;
  Line: string;
  FileName: string;
begin
  FileName := 'test.txt';
  Lines := TStringList.Create;
  try
    Lines.Add('First line');
    Lines.Add('Second line');
    Lines.SaveToFile(FileName);
    Lines.LoadFromFile(FileName);
    for Line in Lines do
      ShowMessage(Line);
  finally
    Lines.Free;
  end;
end;

Also SaveToFile and LoadFromFile can take an additional Encoding in Delphi 2009 and newer to set the text encoding (Ansi, UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16 big endian).

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4  
Yes. This is by far the simplest way. Not only is the TStringList object very easy to work with and rather powerful, TStrings is also used throughout the entire VCL, so that all components can communicate with each other by assigning string lists. I just want to mention alternative ways of working with text files (all of them are more difficult than this, but just for the sake of completeness). See stackoverflow.com/questions/3538156/… –  Andreas Rejbrand Nov 16 '10 at 11:24
1  
Not the simplest in my opinion. The use of TextFile is easier... That is, if you're familiar with AssignFile/Reset/Rewrite/Append/Read/ReadLn/Write/WriteLn/CloseFile and SetTextBuf... ;-) –  Wim ten Brink Nov 16 '10 at 12:55
1  
The string list approach has the limit it is a huge buffer and data are written all at once. The old file interface IMHO is a "legacy" interface which should be superseeded by the new stream interface which is more actual and flexible. Maybe not the "easiest", but sometimes is better to use the "right" code, not the "easiest one" –  user160694 Nov 16 '10 at 13:19
1  
I always use the TextFile approach personally. (Now I've said it.) –  Andreas Rejbrand Nov 16 '10 at 16:49
1  
@ldsandon, TTextReader is just .NOT mirror class and is way too clumsy for simple text I/O. Pascal TextFile wins her. –  Free Consulting Nov 17 '10 at 9:43

Actually, I prefer this:

var
  Txt: TextFile;
  SomeFloatNumber: Double;
  SomeStringVariable: string;
  Buffer: Array[1..4096] of byte;
begin
  SomeStringVariable := 'Text';
  AssignFile(Txt, 'Some.txt');
  Rewrite(Txt);
  SetTextBuf(Txt, Buffer, SizeOf(Buffer));
  try
    WriteLn(Txt, 'Hello, World.');
    WriteLn(Txt, SomeStringVariable);
    SomeFloatNumber := 3.1415;
    WriteLn(Txt, SomeFloatNumber:0:2); // Will save 3.14
  finally CloseFile(Txt);
  end;
end;

I consider this the easiest way, since you don't need the classes or any other unit for this code. And it works for all Delphi versions including -if I'm not mistaken- all .NET versions of Delphi...


I've added a call to SetTextBuf() to this example, which is a good trick to speed up textfiles in Delphi considerably. Normally, textfiles have a buffer of only 128 bytes. I tend to increase this buffer to a multiple of 4096 bytes. In several cases, I'va also implemented my own TextFile types, allowing me to use these "console" functions to write text to memo fields or even to another, external application! At this location is some example code (ZIP) I wrote in 2000 and just modified to make sure it compiles with Delphi 2007. Not sure about newer Delphi versions, though. Then again, this code is 10 years old already.
These console functions have been a standard of the Pascal language since it's beginning so I don't expect them to disappear anytime soon. The TtextRec type might be modified in the future, though, so I can't predict if this code will work in the future... Some explanations:

  • WA_TextCustomEdit.AssignCustomEdit allows text to be written to CustomEdit-based objects like TMemo.
  • WA_TextDevice.TWATextDevice is a class that can be dropped on a form, which contains events where you can do something with the data written.
  • WA_TextLog.AssignLog is used by me to add timestamps to every line of text.
  • WA_TextNull.AssignNull is basically a dummy text device. It just discards anything you write to it.
  • WA_TextStream.AssignStream writes text to any TStream object, including memory streams, file streams, TCP/IP streams and whatever else you have.

Code in link is hereby licensed as CC-BY alt text


Oh, the server with the ZIP file isn't very powerful, so it tends to be down a few times every day. Sorry about that.

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6  
Please, beware that the console operations (like read and write, have unicode issues, so its recommended to use TStringList. –  Toon Krijthe Nov 16 '10 at 12:57
1  
To add to @Gamecat's comment: it is not just the console operations, but all file operations using the AsignFile, Rewrite, Read(Ln), Write(Ln) family of methods. The console operations are actually these file operations operating on a specific set of handles. –  Marjan Venema Nov 16 '10 at 14:51
    
True, unicode is a bit of a problem. But using these functions means that you don't have to buffer the full text in memory before writing it to file. It has it's pro's and con's. –  Wim ten Brink Nov 16 '10 at 15:06
1  
@Gamecat & Workshop Alex, Read/Write[ln] are binary-safe, thus it is possible to make them read and write wide strings –  Free Consulting Nov 17 '10 at 9:48
1  
In newer Delphi versions the classic I/O routines have got some support for Unicode again. Delphi XE added a new Codepage parameter, see also this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/14232900/… –  Jens Mühlenhoff Sep 18 '13 at 9:05

Or if you are using an older version of Delphi (which does not have the for line in lines method of iterating a string list):

var i : integer;
begin

...
try
    Lines.Add('First line');
    Lines.Add('Second line');
    Lines.SaveToFile(FileName);
    Lines.LoadFromFile(FileName);
    for i := 0 to Lines.Count -1 do
      ShowMessage(Lines[i]);
  finally
    Lines.Free;
  end;
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Which should also be a bit more efficient, since for .. in does more work in the background. If your Delphi version is new enough and effeciency does not matter I prefer for .. in though :) –  Jens Mühlenhoff Nov 16 '10 at 16:18

The IOUtils unit which was introduced in Delphi 2010 provides some very convenient functions for writing/reading text files:

//add the text 'Some text' to the file 'C:\users\documents\test.txt':
TFile.AppendAllText('C:\users\documents\text.txt', 'Some text', TEncoding.ASCII);
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If you're using a Delphi version >= 2009, give a look to the TStreamWriter class.

It will also take care of text file encodings and newline characters.

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procedure String2File;
var s:ansiString;
begin
    s:='My String';
    with TFileStream.create('c:\myfile.txt',fmCreate) do
    try
      writeBuffer(s[1],length(s));
    finally
      free;
    end;
end;

Care needed when using unicode strings....

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