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We hit a strange issue on one of customers servers, where Java encounters "Too many files",

Checking the descriptors via lsof produces a large list of "sock" descriptors with "can't identify protocol".

I suspect it happens due to sockets that opened for too much time, but as our thread dump contains a lot of them, I have no clear idea who exactly the culprit.

Is there any good method to detect which threads exactly open these sockets?

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there any good method to detect which threads exactly open these sockets?

Not the threads per se.

One approach is to run the application using a profiler. This could well find the problem even if you cannot exactly reproduce the customer's problem. (@SyBer reports that the YourKit profiler has specific support for finding socket leaks ... see comment.)

A second approach is to tweak your test platform by using ulimit to REDUCE the number of open files allowed. This may make it easier to reproduce the "too many files open" scenario in your test environment.

Finally, I'd recommend "grepping" your codebase to find all places where socket objects are created. Then examine them all to make sure they use correctly try / finally blocks to ensure that the sockets are always closed.

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"One approach is to run the application using a profiler. This could well find the problem even if you cannot exactly reproduce the customer's problem." Can the profiler catch such kind of issues? –  SyBer Nov 23 '10 at 14:21
    
Appropriate use of a profiler can detect the existence of a resource (e.g. Socket) leak that might otherwise not be noticed. –  Stephen C Nov 23 '10 at 21:12
    
We found out that YourKit profiler has built-in sockets monitoring, which very helpful to finding open sockets, and this eventually has solved all of our descriptors leaks. –  SyBer Jan 18 '11 at 9:36

Did you try ulimit to increase amount of open files? Also, it's possible that you're not closing your sockets properly, so you have a leak.

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I can do it, but it would be really a temporary solution, until it grows again. We try to close sockets, but it seems there is a forgotten one indeed. –  SyBer Nov 23 '10 at 14:19

Start from

netstat -ano | grep $YOUR_PROCESS_ID - for unix netstat -ano | find "$YOUR_PROCESS_ID" - for windows

At least you will see the whether connections really exist.

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The only "good" method to detect leaking sockets is either a very verbose log, or a profiler. Do a memory dump and analyse the objects.

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Valgrind will identify file descriptor leaks if you pass --track-fds=yes. Valgrind generates short stack traces at the "acquisition" point of the resources it tracks. When you have located the source lines the leaks are occurring, you can combine this with the return value of pthread_self to your logging system (I'm sure you would be using one!), or place breakpoints in gdb.

Likely you are neglecting to close() sockets that you are finished with. This needs to be done even when the peer initiates the shutdown.

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Valgrind is for C / C++, not for Java. –  Stephen C Nov 16 '10 at 13:44
    
"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio" :). Thanks anyhow. –  SyBer Nov 23 '10 at 14:20
    
There's nothing wrong with using java and linux tags together. –  Stephen C Nov 23 '10 at 21:15

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