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I'm having trouble understanding the finer points of Java generics with wildcards. specifically, why doesn't this compile.

public class Test {

 abstract class Function<A, B> {

  abstract B call(A a);
 }

 interface PropertyType {

  String bubbles();
 }

 class Apartment implements PropertyType {

  @Override
  public String bubbles() {
   return "bubbles";
  }
 }

 public void invokeFunctionOnAList() {

  List<Apartment> apts = new ArrayList<Apartment>();
  functionLoop(apts, new Function<Apartment, String>() {

   @Override
   String call(Apartment a) {
    return a.bubbles();
   }
  });
 }

 public void functionLoop(List<? extends PropertyType> list, Function<? extends PropertyType, String> t) {
  for (PropertyType p : list) {
   t.call(p);
  }
 }
}
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I can see the problem, and most Java compilers will be pretty explicit about it. What errors do you get? –  PaulJWilliams Nov 16 '10 at 11:47
3  
If you're going to report that something fails to compile, you should always include the error message and location. –  Jon Skeet Nov 16 '10 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your compiler does not know if you are using same type in List and Function. Therefore you have to tell him this.

Try this:

public <C extends PropertyType>void functionLoop(
                         List<C> list, Function<C, String> t) {
  for (C p : list) {
    t.call(p);
  }
}
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Oh I see, because the subtype of the List need not be the subtype of the Function ? –  monkjack Nov 16 '10 at 12:08
    
Yes, the type of objects in your List must have the same type of your parameter in your call method in Function. –  Thomas Zuberbühler Nov 16 '10 at 12:13

The most formally correct way to put that code actually is

public <C extends PropertyType> void functionLoop(
        List<C> list, Function<? super C, String> t) {
    for (C p : list) {
        t.call(p);
    }
}

The best explanation of generics I found was on "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch. You can find a small excerpt which can relate to your example in this presentation.

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because call(Apartment a) should get Apartment object as a parameter and you pass a PropertyType object. THough Apartment is-a PropertyType, but PropertyType is-NOT-a Appartment.

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