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I was trying to add items to IList through reflection, but while calling the "Add" method an error was thrown "object ref. not set". While debugging I came to know that the GetMethod("Add") was returning a NULL reference.

Type objTyp = typeof(MyObject); //HardCoded TypeName for demo purpose
var IListRef = typeof (List<>);
Type[] IListParam = {objTyp};          
object Result = IListRef.MakeGenericType(IListParam);

MyObject objTemp = new MyObject(); 
Result.GetType().GetMethod("Add").Invoke(Result, new[] {objTemp });

Please help.

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I've worked quite a bit with reflection a while ago, and I came to the conclusion that I don't like the overload of GetMethod(string), because I never knew if it would return. Try rather using GetMethod(string, Type[]) or GetMethod(string, BindingFlags). Might not make it work, and might just be me beeing paranoid, but I remember having a lot of confusion over similar problems before. –  Alxandr Nov 16 '10 at 12:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're trying to find an Add method in Type, not in List<MyObject> - and then you're trying to invoke it on a Type.

MakeGenericType returns a type, not an instance of that type. If you want to create an instance, Activator.CreateInstance is usually the way to go. Try this:

Type objTyp = typeof(MyObject); //HardCoded TypeName for demo purpose
var IListRef = typeof (List<>);
Type[] IListParam = {objTyp};          
object Result = Activator.CreateInstance(IListRef.MakeGenericType(IListParam));

MyObject objTemp = new MyObject(); 
Result.GetType().GetMethod("Add").Invoke(Result, new[] {objTemp });

(I would also suggest that you start following conventions for variable names, but that's a separate matter.)

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Thank you very much, now its working. I missed out calling the "Activator.CreateInstance". –  AbrahamJP Nov 16 '10 at 12:27
Type objTyp = typeof(MyObject); //HardCoded TypeName for demo purpose
var IListRef = typeof (List<>);
Type[] IListParam = {objTyp};          

IList Result = (IList)IListRef.MakeGenericType(IListParam);
MyObject objTemp = new MyObject(); 
Result.Add(objTemp);

IList.Add(object item); => you can use Add method in IList interface instead of Reflection.

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You have only created a generic type, you haven't created an instance of the type. You have a list type, but you don't have a list.

The Result variabled contains a Type object, so Result.Gettype() returns the same as typeof(Type). You are trying to find an Add method in the Type class, not your list class.

Could you not use generics instead of reflection, e.g.:

public static List<T> CreateListAndAddEmpty<T>() where T : new() {
  List<T> list = new List<T>();
  list.Add(new T());
  return list;
}
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The Generics based solution which you had suggested was an apt one. The reason why I didn't go for generics was that, the PropertyInfo.SetValue method wasn't accepting generic parameter references else I would have definitely went for the Generics version. –  AbrahamJP Nov 16 '10 at 12:58

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