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I have a UITableView that has two modes. When we switch between the modes I have a different number of sections and cells per section. Ideally, it would do some cool animation when the table grows or shrinks.

Here is the code I tried, but it doesn't do anything:

CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext(); 
[UIView beginAnimations:nil context:context]; 
[UIView setAnimationCurve:UIViewAnimationCurveEaseInOut]; 
[UIView setAnimationDuration:0.5]; 

[self.tableView reloadData];
[UIView commitAnimations];

Any thoughts on how I could do this?

Thanks in advance.

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8 Answers 8

Actually, it's very simple:

[_tableView reloadSections:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndex:0] withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationFade];

From the documentation:

Calling this method causes the table view to ask its data source for new cells for the specified sections. The table view animates the insertion of new cells in as it animates the old cells out.

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11  
And simply the best answer on this page! –  Matthias D Nov 30 '11 at 21:42
7  
This is not entirely correct, because it will only reload the first section. If your table has multiple sections, this will not work –  Nosrettap Feb 26 '13 at 21:33
1  
It is possible you will get an exception if no data has changed.. See my answer –  matejkramny Mar 10 '13 at 22:05
    
It's 3 years old and still works perfect. Thanks. –  The-Rooster Oct 20 at 7:58

You might want to use:

/* Animate the table view reload */
[UIView transitionWithView: self.tableView
                  duration: 0.35f
                   options: UIViewAnimationOptionTransitionCrossDissolve
                animations: ^(void)
 {
   [self.tableView reloadData];
 }
                completion: ^(BOOL isFinished)
 {
   /* TODO: Whatever you want here */
 }];

No hassles. :D

You can also use any of the UIViewAnimationOptionTransitions you want for cooler effects.

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1  
This is useful if the start/end state of your tableview will be very different (and it would be complex to calculate the sections and rows to add/remove), but you wand something less jarring that the non-animated reload. –  Ben Packard Nov 27 '12 at 20:54
2  
@Vrol This is the ideal answer for my implementation. When I saw what it did I thought, "oooooh, now that's nice". Thanks! –  Rymnel Sep 4 '13 at 19:04
    
This isn't as nice an animation as reloading the tableview using it's built in methods, but unlike the higher rated method mentioned here, this one works when you have multiple sections. –  Mark Bridges Dec 23 '13 at 10:35
    
Wow after trying all the rest this is defiantly perfect for me –  Lucas Goossen Jan 11 at 2:49
1  
@Anthony It doesn't work if the end state has more/less sections than the starting state. Then you'd have to manually track which sections got added/deleted, which is quite a hassle. –  Marko Nikolovski Jul 8 at 11:57

I believe you can just update your data structure, then:

[tableView beginUpdates];
[tableView deleteSections:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndex:0] withRowAnimation:YES];
[tableView insertSections:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndex:0] withRowAnimation:YES];
[tableView endUpdates];

Also, the "withRowAnimation" is not exactly a boolean, but an animation style:

UITableViewRowAnimationFade,
UITableViewRowAnimationRight,
UITableViewRowAnimationLeft,
UITableViewRowAnimationTop,
UITableViewRowAnimationBottom,
UITableViewRowAnimationNone,
UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle
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This was super simple and worked great for me –  Slee May 27 '11 at 20:22
    
Great, works flawlessly. –  Hallucynogenyc Aug 24 '11 at 10:52
    
Superb , Thanks for sharing this snippet.... –  vishwa.deepak Jul 15 '12 at 8:47
    
Simple stuff, but so easy to go direct to StackOverflow and get the snippet you need, than trawl docs. . Thanks! –  Jasper Blues Feb 4 '13 at 2:26

Have more freedom using CATransition class.

It isn't limited to fading, but can do movements as well..


For example:

(don't forget to import QuartzCore)

CATransition *transition = [CATransition animation];
transition.type = kCATransitionPush;
transition.timingFunction = [CAMediaTimingFunction functionWithName:kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseInEaseOut];
transition.fillMode = kCAFillModeForwards;
transition.duration = 0.5;
transition.subtype = kCATransitionFromBottom;

[[self.tableView layer] addAnimation:transition forKey:@"UITableViewReloadDataAnimationKey"];

Change the type to match your needs, like kCATransitionFade etc.

Reference for CATransition

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Much better method –  random Jul 29 '13 at 21:01
    
this animates the table as a whole, instead of single rows/sections. –  Agos Nov 29 '13 at 15:17
    
@Agos It still answers the question. A question "How to reload only one row" has quite a different answer, such as applying the animation to the layer property of a UITableViewCell. –  matejkramny Nov 29 '13 at 20:04
    
@matejkramny I expected the table to animate just the different rows (as referenced in the question), but this method pushes all the table at once. Maybe I am missing something? –  Agos Nov 29 '13 at 20:10
    
@Agos hmm no it is supposed to do that. It can't do only half the table as QuartzCore modifies the view directly. You can try getting the cells from the table view, and then applying this animation to each though (but not sure it would work) –  matejkramny Nov 29 '13 at 20:20

The way to approach this is to tell the tableView to remove and add rows and sections with the

insertRowsAtIndexPaths:withRowAnimation:, deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:withRowAnimation:, insertSections:withRowAnimation: and deleteSections:withRowAnimation:

methods of UITableView. When you call these methods, the table will animate in/out the items you requested, then call reloadData on itself so you can update the state after this animation. This part is important - if you animate away everything but don't change the data returned by the table's dataSource, the rows will appear again after the animation completes.

So, your application flow would be:

[self setTableIsInSecondState:YES];

[myTable deleteSections:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndex:0] withRowAnimation:YES]];

As long as your table's dataSource methods return the correct new set of sections and rows by checking [self tableIsInSecondState] (or whatever), this will achieve the effect you're looking for.

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All of these answers assume that you are using a UITableView with only 1 section.

To accurately handle situations where you have more than 1 section use:

NSRange range = NSMakeRange(0, (myTableView.numberOfSections - 1));
NSIndexSet *indexSet = [NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndexesInRange:range];
[myTableView reloadSections:indexSet withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationAutomatic];

(Note: you should make sure that you have more than 0 sections!)

Another thing to note is that you may run into a NSInternalInconsistencyException if you attempt to simultaneously update your data source with this code. If this is the case, you can use logic similar to this:

int sectionNumber = 0; //Note that your section may be different

int nextIndex = [currentItems count]; //starting index of newly added items

[myTableView beginUpdates];

for (NSObject *item in itemsToAdd) {
    //Add the item to the data source
    [currentItems addObject:item];

    //Add the item to the table view
    NSIndexPath *path = [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:nextIndex++ inSection:sectionNumber];
    [myTableView insertRowsAtIndexPaths:[NSArray arrayWithObject:path] withRowAnimation:UITableViewRowAnimationAutomatic];
}

[myTableView endUpdates];
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2  
Good point about the section calculations, but I had only one section and your code had an off-by-one error. I had to change the first line of your code to NSRange range = NSMakeRange(0, myTableView.numberOfSections); –  Danyal Aytekin Jul 13 '12 at 12:41

Here's a full example of some really typical code for expanding in the present era (it's November 2013!)

This example shows expanding two lines of the table.

(Note that you can do any number of sections, rows, mixed, in/out, whatever, using this code.)

Note that facebookRowsExpanded is a class variable you must have:

if ( [theCommand isEqualToString:@"fbexpander"] )
// user has clicked on the row that means "expand some lines"...
{
NSLog(@"expander button clicked......");
[tableView deselectRowAtIndexPath:indexPath animated:NO];

NSArray *deleteIndexPaths;
NSArray *insertIndexPaths;

facebookRowsExpanded = !facebookRowsExpanded;
// you must do that BEFORE, not AFTER the animation:

if ( !facebookRowsExpanded ) // ie, it was just true, is now false
    {
    deleteIndexPaths = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:2 inSection:0],
            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:3 inSection:0],
             nil];
    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView
        deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:deleteIndexPaths
        withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle];
    [tableView endUpdates];
    }
else
    {
    insertIndexPaths = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:2 inSection:0],
            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:3 inSection:0],
             nil];
    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView
        insertRowsAtIndexPaths:insertIndexPaths
        withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle];
    [tableView endUpdates];
    }

// DO NOT do this at the end: [_superTableView reloadData];
return;
}

For the index paths in that code, set anything you want.

Here's the critical part: your code for numberOfRowsInSection must use facebookRowsExpanded

(it will be something like "if facebookRowsExpanded return 7, else return 5")

Similarly: your code for cellForRowAtIndexPath must use facebookRowsExpanded.

(it has to return the correct row, depending on whether or not you are expanded.)

Note that UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle is almost certainly the best option to use, it looks best both ways and it looks the most modern.

(Here are the others to try... UITableViewRowAnimationFade, UITableViewRowAnimationRight, UITableViewRowAnimationLeft, UITableViewRowAnimationTop, UITableViewRowAnimationBottom, UITableViewRowAnimationNone, UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle, UITableViewRowAnimationAutomatic )

Here's an actual example of the numberOfRowsInSection. It's a relatively simple example.

Note that in the example, we happen to be taking the rows from a plist. the plist has 7 rows (so that's when expanded in our example). So quite simply it returns as you can see 7 when facebookRowsExpanded is true, 5 when facebookRowsExpanded is false.

Note that in the expansion code above, it's absolutely critical WHERE you flip the boolean: it has to be done just like in the example code above.

-(NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView
 numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
    {
    if ( section == 0 )  // our function buttons
        {
        if ( facebookRowsExpanded )
            return menuRowsFromPlist.count;
        else
            return menuRowsFromPlist.count - 2;
        }

    if ( section == 1 ) // some other part of the table..
        return .. etc
    return 0;
    }

Finally for cellForRowAtIndexPath, it will look something like this:

- (UITableViewCell*)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView
  cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
if ( facebookRowsExpanded )
    for example, for indexPath.row 6, you'd return item 6
if ( ! facebookRowsExpanded )
    for example, for indexPath.row 6, you'd return item 4
   }

Note that the simplest way is: have two different arrays (or NSDictionaries, or plists, or whatever), one of the expanded state and one for the collapsed state.

Alternately you can iterate over something and "skip over" the collapsed items. (That's probably the most absolutely general solution for wildly complicated situations.)

In some incredibly complicated situation you could possibly use KVO to make it much easier; in any event it's essential to return the correct row "at that moment" (BASED ON facebookRowsExpanded).

Of course, if it's just a very small simple table, just code it by hand, perhaps with a switch statement for each case of facebookRowsExpanded.

Again, it's critical that cellForRowAtIndexPath -- and numberOfRowsInSection -- return exactly correct values "at this moment" DEPENDING ON the value of the global facebookRowsExpanded. And again, it's critical to flip that boolean at the correct point in the animation code (as shown above).

Hope it helps someone.


I forgot to mention. You'll possibly want to change the "expand" row itself. ie, the actual row the user would click on to reveal the other two rows.

(You might be using, say, the disclosure triangle, or whatever, but sometimes you want to change that actual row, at the same moment you animate the reveal of the two new rows.)

Here's example code for that:

{
NSLog(@"expander button......");
[tableView deselectRowAtIndexPath:indexPath animated:NO];

NSArray *expansionItemsIndexPaths = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:2 inSection:0],
                            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:3 inSection:0],
                            nil];

NSArray *swapItemIndexPath = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                            [NSIndexPath indexPathForRow:1 inSection:0],
                            nil];

facebookRowsExpanded = !facebookRowsExpanded;

if ( !facebookRowsExpanded )    // ie, it was just true
    {
    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView
        deleteRowsAtIndexPaths: expansionItemsIndexPaths
        withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle];
    [tableView endUpdates];

    [tableView reloadRowsAtIndexPaths:swapItemIndexPath
       withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationFade];
    // YOU MAY PREFER: UITableViewRowAnimationNone
    }
else
    {
    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView
        insertRowsAtIndexPaths: expansionItemsIndexPaths
        withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationMiddle];
    [tableView endUpdates];

    [tableView reloadRowsAtIndexPaths:swapItemIndexPath
       withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimationFade];
    // YOU MAY PREFER: UITableViewRowAnimationNone
    }

return;
}

The secret is simply to use reloadRowsAtIndexPaths with just the one row in question, and, do that just "after" your reveal or collapse. I do not know whether UITableViewRowAnimationFade or UITableViewRowAnimationNone gives the most modern look, try both for your project. Hope it helps someone.

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Swift Implementation:

let range = NSMakeRange(0, self.tableView!.numberOfSections())
let indexSet = NSIndexSet(indexesInRange: range)
self.tableView!.reloadSections(indexSet, withRowAnimation: UITableViewRowAnimation.Automatic)
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