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here is the code and comment:

template<class T>
struct B
{
    B(){}

    template<class T1> operator T1() { return T1(); }

    // define this macro if your compiler fails.
#if (defined USE_MORE_TIDOUS_WAY) // (defined _MSC_VER)
    template<class T1> explicit B(B<T1> const& ) {}
    template<class T1> operator B<T1>() { return B<T1>(); }
#else
    template<class T1> B(B<T1> const& ) {}
#endif


#if 0
    ////// Explanation:

    // firstly, I want to have this convserion ctor :
    template<class T1> B(B<T1> const& ) {}

    // and the conversion function :
    template<class T1> operator T1() { return T1(); }

    // but may be T1 is too general, which could hide above
    // conversion ctor from some compilers (msvc8~10 fail, gcc 4.4.0~ is ok)

    // To overcome such case, add another conversion function :
    template<class T1> operator B<T1>() { return B<T1>(); }

    // and do not use conversion ctor, while we can still have ctor upon B<T1>
    template<class T1> explicit B(B<T1> const& ) {}

#endif
};


// test cases

template<class T> void func(T const&){};

void test()
{
    typedef B<int>      B1;
    typedef B<float>    B2; 

    B1 b1;
    B2 b2 = b1; // B1 => B2
    b1 = b2;    // B2 => B1
    b2 = b1;    // B1 => B2
    func<B1>(b2);   // B2 => B1
    func<B2>(b1);   // B1 => B2
}

int main()
{
    test();
}

So, which conversion is more standard conformed and preferred?

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Something explosive fell in to your formatting, any chance you can clean it up a bit? –  Moo-Juice Nov 16 '10 at 14:35
1  
Can you explain what you are trying to accomplish with this? There's probably a much better way. –  James McNellis Nov 16 '10 at 14:39
    
template<class T1> operator T1();: This says you can convert a B<T> to any type at all. How is that useful? –  aschepler Nov 16 '10 at 14:48
    
hi, James McNellis, basically, I want a templated operator T1(), to convert to various numeric type which could be either built in or user defined. There will be some policy class working inside the operator T1() that is unknown to the class B. –  feverzsj Nov 16 '10 at 14:50
    
@fever: That still doesn't say what you're trying to accomplish. That's the step you've decided you need to take, sure, but why do you need that? Ask about the big picture, not the step. –  GManNickG Nov 16 '10 at 18:57
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1 Answer

The problem with this conversion:

template<class T1> operator T1() { return T1(); }

is that it will convert B to anything, so these will compile:

typedef B<int>      B1;
typedef B<float>    B2; 

B1 b1;
B2 b2 = b1; // B1 => B2
int x = b1; // compiles
std::string s = b2; // compiles

Looking at your test case, these examples require an assignment operator not copy constructor:

b1 = b2;    // B2 => B1
b2 = b1;    // B1 => B2

So if you define your class with assignment operators like this, your test cases should work:

template<class T>
struct B
{
    B(){}
    B& operator=(B&){ return B<T>();};

    template<class T1> B(B<T1> const& ) {}
    template<class T1> B& operator=(B<T1>&){return B<T>();};

};
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