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On Windows file names like com1.txt or lpt1.txt are forbidden. Is there a list of all forbidden file and folder names on windows (or forbidden chars in the file and folder names like :? ...)

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

The list of invalid characters is:

  • < (less than)
  • > (greater than)
  • : (colon)
  • " (double quote)
  • / (forward slash)
  • \ (backslash)
  • | (vertical bar or pipe)
  • ? (question mark)
  • * (asterisk)

Plus characters 1 to 31

Source

But you should use System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars and System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars (or their equivalents) as recommended by FlipScript as a) it's neater and b) means that if the list ever changes you won't have to modify your application.

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6  
Would be awesome IF GetInvalidPathChars would be complete. For example the ? character isn't in this array... Thus, making this completely useless... – Highmastdon Mar 5 '13 at 8:11
    
Asterisk * is also not included in System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars() – Richard Moore Apr 20 at 11:23

A list of reserved device names:

http://www.blindedbytech.com/2006/11/16/forbidden-file-and-folder-names-on-windows/

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The link seems to be dead now. – ayke Feb 5 '13 at 15:17
    
@ayke wayback machine to the rescue! – Ian Kemp Dec 17 '13 at 18:14

You didn't mention what platform you are using, but in .Net, you can use:

System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars

and

System.IO.Path.GetInvalidPathChars

To return invalid file name and path characters.

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1  
These methods are useless as the documentation itself states: "The array returned from this method is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid in file and directory names." – Rupert Rawnsley Nov 5 '14 at 14:54

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