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I have a struct like this:

struct A 
{   
  char x[];
};

What does it mean? When I do something like:

A a;
a.x = "hello";

gcc throws an error saying:

error: incompatible types in assignent of 'const char [6]' to 'char [0u]'
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This appears to be C++. The example provided won't compile as C because a plain A is not defined at that point (struct A is defined). c tag removed. –  pmg Nov 16 '10 at 15:55
    
@pmg The example provided won't compile as C++ either. test.cc:3:16: error: ISO C++ forbids zero-size array 'x' –  Cubbi Nov 16 '10 at 15:57
    
@pmg: isn't the code not compiling the reason of the question? –  Alexis Dufrenoy Nov 16 '10 at 15:57
2  
There are two reasons that it doesn't compile in C++, but only one in C. Not sure why this is tagged C++ only if the highest voted answer is correctly about a C feature... –  Charles Bailey Nov 16 '10 at 16:01
    
c tag reintroduced. ebascomp should choose the language s/he is using. –  pmg Nov 16 '10 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is a C99 "flexible array member". See here for gcc specifics: http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/gcc/gcc_42.html

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2  
May also be useful to note that this is an error in C++ (question is tagged for two languages) –  Cubbi Nov 16 '10 at 15:53

This structure has a C99 flexible array member. As such it's invalid to declare variables of type struct A, but you can declare a variable of type struct A * (pointer to struct A) and use malloc to obtain memory for it as:

struct A *a = malloc(sizeof *a + strlen(mystring) + 1);
strcpy(a->x, mystring);
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First of all, in C++, you can't have an array of unspecified size. Also, you should use a pointer instead of an array if you want to assign to them string literals:

struct A 
{   
  char* x;
};
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1  
For the downvoter, the question is tagged "c++", I just forgot to say that applies to C++. I don't know about C99. –  AraK Nov 16 '10 at 15:50
    
Your answer is correct for C++ but wrong for C (C99). (I'm not the downvoter though.) –  R.. Nov 16 '10 at 16:23

char x[] can be read as "x is a pointer to an array of char for which we have not yet allocated the necessary memory". However you either have to specify a contant size (char x[6]) or declare this as a pointer (char* x)

a.x = "hello" does not work because a.x does not point to any memory space you could have allocated. Additionally, the compiler complains about assigning something supposed to be constant (the string) to something that could be changed by the program.

You either have to declare x constant or copy the string manually using a function such as strcpy.

For instance:

struct A 
{   
    char *x;
};

A a; 
a.x = new char[6]; 
strcpy(a.x, "Hello");
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Oops, did not know about char x[] being allowed in C. –  Vincent Mimoun-Prat Nov 16 '10 at 16:00
    
This does not compile: incompatible types in assignment of ‘char*’ to ‘char [0u]’. That's because char x[] is an array; you can't assign a pointer to it. –  David Gelhar Nov 16 '10 at 16:09

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