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I've got a text box control on a page and I want people to add URLs, one on each line and then split those URLs into an array.

So, I'm trying to split them on the newline character. I've tried:

.split(Environment.Newline)
.split('vbcrlf')
.split(vbcrlf)
.split((char)Environment.Newline)

but all to no avail. What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted
.split(new []{Environment.Newline}, StringSplitOptions.None);

This is because Environment.Newline is a string, so you must pass it in as an array of strings, as the function overload requires, also there needs to be a StringSplitOptions value included. This can either be StringSplitOption.None or StringSplitOption.RemoveEmptyEntries.

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Also had to add a string split option. Now looks like .Split(UrlSplit,StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries) –  Piers Karsenbarg Nov 16 '10 at 16:16
    
Damn, I was too fast for my own good. You're quite right. I'll update my answer. –  Matt Ellen Nov 16 '10 at 16:18
    
What's the difference between .RemoveEmptyEntries and .None? –  Piers Karsenbarg Nov 17 '10 at 11:31
    
Using RemoveEmptyEntries with the above .Split means that (say Environment.NewLine == \n) given the string "this is a string\n\nwith two new lines" you will get an array of 2 items ("this is a string" and "with two new lines"), but if you use None then you get an array of 3 items ("this is a string, "", and "with two new lines") because of the consecutive new line characters –  Matt Ellen Nov 17 '10 at 11:46

"\r\n" is the string representation

\r = carriage return \n = line feed

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3  
Right, for windows. To keep things platform independent, you should be using Environment.Newline. –  Oded Nov 16 '10 at 16:08

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