Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Been trying to solve this without progress for a couple days, my question:

Given an entity in a hierarchy, return a list of the immediate-ascendants (or parents) of the entity.

When I want to know the hierarchy of "Entity 1.2.2.2" it would return a list containing only the bold items:

Entity 1
- Entity 1.1
- Entity 1.2
  - Entity 1.2.1
  - Entity 1.2.2
    - Entity 1.2.2.1
    - Entity 1.2.2.2
  - Entity 1.2.3
  - Entity 1.2.4
    - Entity 1.2.4.1
- Entity 1.3
- Entity 1.4
Entity 2
...

Hence, expected result:

Entity 1
- Entity 1.2
  - Entity 1.2.2
    - Entity 1.2.2.2

Implementation code:

class Entity
{
    public Entity Parent { get; set; }

    public bool AbsoluteParent 
    { 
        get
        { 
            return Parent == null;
        } 
    }

    public IEnumerable<Entity> Hierarchy //problem
    { 
        get
        {
            return AbsoluteParent 
                ? new [] { this }
                : new [] { this }.Concat( Parent.Hierarchy );
        }
    }

}

The array attempt above is just one of the options I have been trying, that code actually returns something like:

Entity 1
Entity 1
- Entity 1.2
Entity 1
- Entity 1.2
  - Entity 1.2.2
Entity 1
- Entity 1.2
  - Entity 1.2.2
    - Entity 1.2.2.2

I am able to achieve the expected results using jQuery's parents() function, I've been reading the yield return keywords but still stuck in its more (I guess) functional style which I'm still baby-stepping into.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not a very LINQ way of doing it (my LINQ is still pretty new):

List<Entity> graph = new List<Entity>()
Entity current = this;

while (current != null) {
   graph.Add(current);
   current = current.Parent;
}

graph.Reverse();

return graph;
share|improve this answer
    
I did remove the Linq from the title, sorry about that. Testing the code! –  F.Aquino Nov 16 '10 at 16:48
1  
graph should be typed as List<Entity>. IEnumerable<T> doesn't contain an Add method. Additionally, if you don't retype, Reverse will bind to the Enumerable.Reverse extension method rather than the instance method on List<T> (not visible) , which is not what you want. –  Ani Nov 16 '10 at 17:34

Is an iterator block acceptable?

public IEnumerable<Entity> Hierarchy
{
    // note: buffers results
    get { return UpwardHierarchy.Reverse(); }    
}

public IEnumerable<Entity> UpwardHierarchy
{
    get
    {
        // genuine lazy streaming
        for (var entity = this; entity != null; entity = entity.Parent)
            yield return entity;
    }
}

Another option: Using MoreLinq's Generate:

return MoreEnumerable.Generate(this, entity => entity.Parent)
                     .TakeWhile(entity => entity != null)
                     .Reverse();
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldnt the Reverse on the first example force a full evaluation of the entity, and invalidate the yield? –  GrayWizardx Nov 16 '10 at 16:50
    
I'm not sure if I agree with the word 'invalidate', but yes, it will result in buffering. I don't think this problem can be solved efficiently without buffering. –  Ani Nov 16 '10 at 16:53
    
Invalidate in terms of allowing the yield to yield control flow back to the (initial) caller, since the Hierarchy call would encapsulate the yield and force the evaluation to be able to invoke Reverse. I agree the structure of this particular question pretty much requires some type of direct queuing of the results. –  GrayWizardx Nov 16 '10 at 16:57
    
It ends up all the codes work, including my IEnumerable<Entity>.Concat() attempt, it was the way I was binding it that was wrong. Is there any drawbacks in using the [] {}.Concat() above? –  F.Aquino Nov 16 '10 at 17:06
    
@F.Aquino: I think it's fine, except that it will be in the opposite order of what you state in the problem. What perspective are you concerned about? Performance? –  Ani Nov 16 '10 at 17:12

As @Ani comments on his answer, there is no way to get a lazy hierarchy from the root.

There is an interesting manner of execution table that shows the "Reverse()" method as "Deferred Non-Streaming Execution". So its only evaluated when you access its first item (root) but it needs to read the entire UpwardHierarchy to yield this first item.

If you want performance, something you should pay atention is the way linq (and any "yield return" method) produces the IEnumerable<>. If you are going to iterate only once on Hierarchy enumerable its ok to ignore this alert, but if you are going to search Hierarchy items several times its a good idea to call ToList() to avoid re-processing both UpwardHierarchy and "Reverse()".

Some code:

[TestClass]
public class HierarchyTest
{
    #region Ani's code
    class Entity
    {
        public Entity Parent { get; set; }

        public IEnumerable<Entity> Hierarchy
        {
            // note: buffers results
            get { return UpwardHierarchy.Reverse(); }
        }

        public int YieldCount = 0;//modified
        public IEnumerable<Entity> UpwardHierarchy
        {
            get
            {
                // genuine lazy streaming
                for (var entity = this; entity != null; entity = entity.Parent)
                {
                    YieldCount++;//modified
                    yield return entity;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion


    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        /*
        Entity 1
        - Entity 1.2
          - Entity 1.2.2
            - Entity 1.2.2.2
         */
        var e1 = new Entity();
        var e12 = new Entity() { Parent = e1 };
        var e122 = new Entity() { Parent = e12 };
        var e1222 = new Entity() { Parent = e122 };

        var hierarchy = e1222.Hierarchy;
        Assert.AreEqual(0, e1222.YieldCount);//nothing was evaluated until now
        hierarchy.First();
        Assert.AreEqual(4, e1222.YieldCount);//the entire UpwardHierarchy has been yielded to get the first Hierarchy item
        hierarchy.First();
        Assert.AreEqual(8, e1222.YieldCount);//yielded all UpwardHierarchy  itens again to get the first Hierarchy item

        List<Entity> evaluatedHierarchy = e1222.Hierarchy.ToList();//calling ToList() produces a List<Entity> instance so UpwardHierarchy and Reverse() are evaluated only once
        Assert.AreEqual(12, e1222.YieldCount);//Yieldcount+=4 because of ToList()
        evaluatedHierarchy.First();
        Assert.AreEqual(12, e1222.YieldCount);//and now you can use evaluatedHierarchy as you wish without causing another UpwardHierarchy and Reverse() call.
        evaluatedHierarchy.First();
        Assert.AreEqual(12, e1222.YieldCount);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the MSDN link; I'd never seen that page before. –  Ani Nov 17 '10 at 2:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.