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Hi I'm new to TDD and xUnit so I want to test my method that is something like :

List<T> DeleteElements<T>(this List<T> a, List<T> b);

of course that's not the real method :) Is there any Assert method that I can use ? I think something like this would be nice

    List<int> values = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 };
    List<int> expected = new List<int>() { 1 };
    List<int> actual = values.DeleteElements(new List<int>() { 2, 3 });

    Assert.Exact(expected, actual);

Is there something like this ?

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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

xUnit.Net recognizes collections so you just need to do

Assert.Equal(expected, actual); // Order is important

You can see other available collection assertions in CollectionAsserts.cs

For NUnit library collection comparison methods are

CollectionAssert.AreEqual(IEnumerable, IEnumerable) // For sequences, order matters

and

CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent(IEnumerable, IEnumerable) // For sets, order doesn't matter

More details here: Collection Constraints (NUnit 2.4 / 2.5)

MbUnit also has CollectionAssert class with behavior very similar to NUnit: CollectionAssert class

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Source code link changed for xunit.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/… –  VirtualBlackFox Sep 7 '10 at 12:26
    
New link in comments broken too. –  Scott Stafford Feb 23 '13 at 17:46
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In the current version of XUnit (1.5) you can just use

Assert.Equal(expected, actual);

The above method will do an element by element comparison of the two lists. I'm not sure if this works for any prior version.

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Thanks for that. –  Dave Ziegler Aug 31 '11 at 17:04
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The problem I encountered with Assert.Equal for collections is that it fails if the collections' elements are in different orders, even if the elements are present in both. –  Scott A. Lawrence Apr 18 '12 at 20:06
    
@ScottA.Lawrence Lists have order too! Do you get the same behavior with HashSets? –  johv Jul 18 '12 at 9:13
    
@johv I haven't tested it with HashSets, but that's a good idea. Once I've had a chance to try it I'll try to remember to answer here. –  Scott A. Lawrence Jul 18 '12 at 16:06
    
does it work for dictionaries too? –  chester89 Feb 14 at 13:09
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