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I am fairly new to inheritance and wanted to ask something. I have a base class that has lots of functionality that is shared by a number of derived classes.

The only difference for each derived class is a single method called Name. The functionality is the same for each derived class, but there is a need for the Name distinction.

I have a property in the base class called Name. How do I arrange it so that the derived classes can each override the base class property?

Thanks.

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1  
I think having a Method and a Property with identical names is asking for trouble. Class.Name would compile fine even if Class.Name() was intended. If there is a compelling reason for this design just be careful. –  Sorax Nov 16 '10 at 17:09
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Declare your method as virtual

public class A
{
    public virtual string Name(string name)
    {
        return name;
    }
}
public class B : A
{
    public override string Name(string name)
    {
        return base.Name(name); // calling A's method
    }
}
public class C : A
{
    public override string Name(string name)
    {
        return "1+1";
    }
}
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Use a virtual property:

class Base
{
    public virtual string Foo
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    public override string Foo
    {
        get {
            // Return something else...
        }
        set {
            // Do something else...
        }
    }
}
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Perfect....thanks. I was trying things like that, but just couldn't seem to get it right. –  Darren Young Nov 16 '10 at 17:09
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You can declare it with a virtual or abstract keyword in the base class, then the derived class can over-ride it

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you need to declare your property (in the base clase) as virtual

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To enable each derived class to override the property you just need to mark the property as virtual

class Base {
  public virtual Property1 { 
    get { ... }
    set { ... }
  }
}
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Well I'm not sure from your description that inheritance is actually the right solution to the problem but here's how you make it possible for a property to be overridden:

class Base
{
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

But do you need it to be writable? A readonly property may make more sense in which case this might work:

class Base
{
    public virtual string Name
    {
        get { return "BaseName"; }
    }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "Derived"; }
    }
}
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In the base class:

public virtual string Name { get; set; }

In the derived classes:

public override string Name { get; set; }

However, if the only difference between the classes is that they have different names, I'd argue that instead of inheritance you should just use the base class with the Name set in the constructor:

e.g.

public class MyObject
{
     public string Name { get; private set; }

     public enum ObjectType { TypeA, TypeB, ... }

     public MyObject(ObjectType obType)
     {
          switch (obType)
          {
              case ObjectType.TypeA:
                  Name = "Type A";
              // and so on
          }
     }
} 
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