Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a simple code of defining an array. I noticed this code will work(compile and run) under Linux(OpenSue,gcc compiler), but it will not work under Windows system. The compiler gave error prompt. Does anybody know the reason? Thanks!

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int N;
    cin>>N;
    int ar[N];
    ar[0]=0;
    cout<<"ar[0]= "<<ar[0]<<endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Define "work" vs. "not work"... –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 16 '10 at 17:12
    
What compiler are you using in Windows? –  Jefromi Nov 16 '10 at 17:12
2  
As the error you quoted says, you didn't sacrifice the right kind of goat. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 16 '10 at 17:22
    
How could this possibly work under GCC? I didn't think that GCC was that big of a pile. –  John Dibling Nov 16 '10 at 19:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The code isn’t valid C++ since C++ does not allow declaring a (stack-allocated) array with a variable size as you do. The reason for this is that C++ offers better mechanisms of declaring dynamically sized arrays, using the std::vector class from its standard library:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int N;
    cin >> N;
    vector<int> ar(N);
    ar[0] = 0;
    cout << "ar[0] = " << ar[0] << endl;
    return 0;
}

g++ (the compiler you used on Linux) by default allows this through a compiler extension.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the code can be compiled and run and give right result. So you think gcc compiler is the reason? –  Jackie Nov 16 '10 at 17:20
1  
@Jackie When compiling with gcc, use the option -ansi -pedantic to avoid surprises like this. And add -Wall -Wextra for good practice. –  Cubbi Nov 16 '10 at 17:34
1  
Works in GCC because it's a valid construct in the newer C standard. GCC doesn't make clear distinctions between the two languages unless you ask it to. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 16 '10 at 17:35
1  
Note that the reason why variable size arrays are not allowed in C++ is that the size is part of the type, and if they were allowed then the exact type of a variable would be unknown at compile time. Think on what happens if you pass a variable sized array to template <typename T, int N> void foo( T (&a)[N] );. The size of the array while calling that template is required at compile time (to produce a particular instantiation), but with variable sized arrays it is only known at runtime. That C++ offers other containers is not a reason not to offer this feature. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 16 '10 at 19:00

This isn't really a difference between Linux and Windows per se. It's a difference between gcc and MS VC++.

This type of code is legal and allowed in C (as of C99). It's not, however, allowed in C++ -- but gcc provides it as an extension in C++ anyway. In this particular respect, MS VC++ attempts to follow the (C++) standard more closely, and does not provide this particular extension.

If you run gcc on Windows, however, (e.g., Cygwin or MinGW) you'll get the same behavior on Windows that you're currently observing on Linux.

As @Konrad Rudolph already pointed out, the right way to handle this under C++ is almost certainly to switch from using an array to using a vector instead.

share|improve this answer

Variable-length arrays (e.g. int ar[N];) are not permitted in C++, but GCC can do them anyway.

share|improve this answer

not sure why it compiles in linux, but you can't declare int ar[N] on the stack like that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.