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How can I run linux binary under windows? Is there some emulation jar or something to run linux program under windows from java program code like Runtime.getRuntime().exec()?

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5 Answers

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In some cases tool like cygwin can help you. BTW if you wish to run windows program under linux you can use wine.

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Assuming that you're asking if you're able to run a random Linux binary (ie, not a Java program built under Linux) under Windows, the answer is simple - no, not without building it as a Windows executable.

You should be able to run a 100% Java program on Windows and Linux unless you're making use of libraries that aren't available on both OSs.

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This is completely impossible for arbitrary (non-Java) programs.

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actually, it can be done with colinux.org –  BRPocock Feb 14 '12 at 19:06
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You can use a virtual machine with linux installed inside of windows.

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I expect rather answer about use JPC to emulate, because virtualization is so obvious –  jlmfao Nov 16 '10 at 18:54
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This not possible unless it's binary of an interpreted language (like Java binary). Also looks completely imposable to write a 'converter' between OSes: even slight difference in design of the OSes cannot be converted as it becomes necessary to write 'logic' converter!?? (not even mentioning the numerous Unix implementations) Think of this: if to linux process means different thing from what it means to windows then how would this get converted ?:) It's not only syntactical but most importantly a logic difference which hurdles possibility of having what you need exist already.

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