Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have this function:

min(List1, List2, Output) :-
   length(List1, N),
   length(List2, M),
   (   N < M ->
       Output = 'true'
   ;   Output = 'false'
   ).

but what if I wanted to also check if N == M? Maybe like this:

min(List1, List2, Output) :-
   length(List1, N),
   length(List2, M),
   (   N < M ->
       Output = 'true'
   ;   (  N = M ->
          Output = 'equal'
       ;  Output = 'other'
       )
   ).

Doesn't seem to work.

share|improve this question
    
What, exactly, doesn't seem to work? Are you getting answers you don't expect, or does it not compile? –  sharky Nov 16 '10 at 22:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your nesting of implication (->) looks correct here. Note that, in your definition, N and M will be integers (assuming the calls to length/2 both succeed), so can be compared with == instead of unification (=). In fact, you could even use arithmetic equals in SWI-PROLOG, namely, =:=:

min(List1, List2, Output) :-
    length(List1, N),
    length(List2, M),
    (N < M ->
        Output = 'true'
    ;   (N =:= M ->
            Output = 'equal'
        ;   Output = 'other'
        )
    ).

Testing:

1 ?- min([a],[b],O).
O = equal.

2 ?- min([a,c],[b],O).
O = other.

3 ?- min([a,c],[b,d],O).
O = equal.

4 ?- min([a,c],[b,d,e],O).
O = true.
share|improve this answer

In nested if-then-else, it is common to omit redundant parentheses, yielding:

min(List1, List2, Output) :-
    length(List1, N),
    length(List2, M),
    (   N < M -> Output = true
    ;   N =:= M -> Output = equal
    ;   Output = other
    ).

For this particular case of conditions, also check out the compare/3 library predicate.

share|improve this answer
    
Quite nice, I like this style, it's neater. I wonder if the operator precedence rules for ->, ;, etc. are common amongst other PROLOG implementations such that this isn't SWI-PROLOG specific (probably the case)? –  sharky Nov 17 '10 at 3:00
    
@Sharky, I don't have an ISO standard ready, but I've seen this style before and @mat's code works perfectly in SICStus 3.12. –  larsmans Nov 17 '10 at 13:54
    
@larsmans: The example uses only ISO's predefined operators. See iso-prolog for how to get the standard for USD 30! –  false Mar 22 '12 at 0:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.