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I'm new to LINQ and I have this situation. I have this table:

ID Date  Range
1 10/10/10 9-10
2 10/10/10 9-10
3 10/10/10 9-10
4 10/10/10 8-9
5 10/11/10 1-2
6 10/11/10 1-2
7 10/12/10 5-6

I just want to list the Maximun of rows per date by range, like this:

Date  Range  Total
10/10/10 9-10  3
10/11/10 1-2  2
10/12/10 5-6  1

I want to do this by using LINQ, do you have any ideas of how to do this?

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4 Answers 4

I think something along these lines should work:

List<MyTable> items = GetItems();
var orderedByMax = from i in items
                   group i by i.Date into g
                   let q = g.GroupBy(i => i.Range)
                            .Select(g2 => new {Range = g2.Key, Count = g2.Count()})
                            .OrderByDescending(i => i.Count)
                   let max = q.FirstOrDefault()
                   select new {
                      Date = g.Key,
                      Range = max.Range,
                      Total = max.Count
                   };
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A couple typos: 1) it should read "group i by i.Date" not "group i by new i.Date" and 2) missing a comma after "Range = max.Range". Typos aside, this works. Took me a while to wrap my head around it, but it works. :) –  Ecyrb Nov 17 '10 at 16:42
    
@Ecyrb: I fixed the typos. I have to admit, it was a more complicated query than it first seemed like it would be. I shudder at the thought of trying to do it with straight SQL. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 17 '10 at 17:53

Using extension methods:

List<MyTable> items = GetItems();

var rangeTotals = items.GroupBy(x => new { x.Date, x.Range }) // Group by Date + Range
                  .Select(g => new { 
                              Date = g.Key.Date, 
                              Range = g.Key.Range, 
                              Total = g.Count() // Count total of identical ranges per date
                              });

var rangeMaxTotals = rangeTotals.Where(rt => !rangeTotals.Any(z => z.Date == rt.Date && z.Total > rt.Total)); // Get maximum totals for each date
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I learned several things from this example - thanks! –  bwperrin Sep 1 at 14:34

unfortunately I can't test this at the moment but give this a try:

List<MyTable> items = GetItems();
items.Max(t=>t.Range.Distinct().Count());
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Can you explain what is this meant to do ? Since Max returns a single value I'm not sure how it can help in this question. –  Jla Nov 17 '10 at 14:53

This approach:
1) Groups by Date
2) For each Date, groups by Range and calculates the Total
3) For each Date, selects the item with the greatest Total
4) You end up with your result

public sealed class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var items = new[]
        {
            new { ID = 1, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 10), Range = "9-10" },
            new { ID = 2, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 10), Range = "9-10" },
            new { ID = 3, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 10), Range = "9-10" },
            new { ID = 4, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 10), Range = "8-9" },
            new { ID = 5, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 11), Range = "1-2" },
            new { ID = 6, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 11), Range = "1-2" },
            new { ID = 7, Date = new DateTime(10, 10, 12), Range = "5-6" },
        };

        var itemsWithTotals = items
            .GroupBy(item => item.Date)  // Group by Date.
            .Select(groupByDate => groupByDate
                .GroupBy(item => item.Range)  // Group by Range.
                .Select(groupByRange => new
                {
                    Date = groupByDate.Key,
                    Range = groupByRange.Key,
                    Total = groupByRange.Count()
                })  // Got the totals for each grouping.
                .MaxElement(item => item.Total));  // For each Date, grab the item (grouped by Range) with the greatest Total.

        foreach (var item in itemsWithTotals)
            Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", item.Date.ToShortDateString(), item.Range, item.Total);

        Console.Read();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// From the book LINQ in Action, Listing 5.35.
/// </summary>
static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static TElement MaxElement<TElement, TData>(this IEnumerable<TElement> source, Func<TElement, TData> selector) where TData : IComparable<TData>
    {
        if (source == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (selector == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("selector");

        bool firstElement = true;
        TElement result = default(TElement);
        TData maxValue = default(TData);
        foreach (TElement element in source)
        {
            var candidate = selector(element);
            if (firstElement || (candidate.CompareTo(maxValue) > 0))
            {
                firstElement = false;
                maxValue = candidate;
                result = element;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
}

According to LINQ in Action (Chapter 5.3.3 - Will LINQ to Objects hurt the performance of my code?), using the MaxElement extension method is one of the most effecient approaches. I think the performance would be O(4n); one for the first GroupBy, two for the second GroupBy, three for the Count(), and four for loop within MaxElement.

DrDro's approach is going to be more like O(n^2) since it loops the entire list for each item in the list.

StriplingWarrior's approach is going to be closer to O(n log n) because it sorts the items. Though I'll admit, there may be some crazy magic in there that I don't understand.

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1  
+1. When using LINQ to Objects, this is a good approach. Since the OP mentioned a "table" I am assuming he's using LINQ to Entities or LINQ to SQL, which won't support your custom MaxElement extension methods. Regarding the performance of my answer, I believe the combination of OrderBy and FirstOrDefault will allow the database engine to optimize it and avoid sorting the entire table. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 17 '10 at 18:01

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