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I want to rewrite some signal processing code of mine from C++ to Java. I wind up with matrices of complex numbers (numbers with imaginary components). I need to find the inverse of an NxN complex matrix, as well as the principle eigenvector.

There are several Java libraries to do this with real numbers, but I couldn't find anything that supported complex numbers. I found one library but it was proprietary and had to be licensed.

Has this been implemented anywhere?

I can always wrap the needed C code with JNI, but I was doing this to avoid platform dependence.

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closed as not constructive by Will Aug 19 '12 at 19:54

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5 Answers 5

I'd recommend Apache Commons Math. I believe that it carries on from where JAMA left off.

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Ah, they do support complex numbers. Its a little hidden in the documentation. –  MattRS Nov 17 '10 at 1:50
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In a past university course, I worked with JAMA.

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There is a java LAPACK that's basically an automatic translation of the FORTRAN one: http://www.netlib.org/java/f2j/ . The packaged sources don't include the complex ones unfortunately, but you can apply the same technique to those, I guess. Might be a lot of effort though, and I can't vouch for the performance to be satisfactory.

Also have a look at JavaNumerics at http://math.nist.gov/javanumerics/#libraries . They have a quite comprehensive list of things that might help you.

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I recommend Michael Thomas Flanagan's Java Scientific Library: http://www.ee.ucl.ac.uk/~mflanaga/java/index.html

I found it much easier to use than the others mentioned in this post so far.

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Thank you for the link. Unfortunately, like the other libraries posted, it cannot compute the eigenvectors of a complex matrix. –  MattRS Mar 17 '11 at 5:40
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cern.colt is worth trying.

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