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Before I start, I'm already aware that object immutability in Python is often a bad idea, however, I believe that in my case it would be appropriate.

Let's say I'm working with a coordinate system in my code, such that each coordinate uses a struct of X, Y, Z. I've already overloaded subtraction, addition, etc. methods to do what I want. My current problem is the assignment operator, which I've read cannot be overloaded. Problem is when I have the following, I do not want A to point to the same point as B, I want the two to be independent, in case I need to overwrite a coordinate of one but not the other later:

B = Point(1,2,3)
A = B

I'm aware that I can use deepcopy, but that seems like a hack, especially since I could have a list of points that I might need to take a slice of (in which case it would again have a slice of point references, not points). I've also considered using tuples, but my points have member methods I need, and a very large portion of my code already uses the structs.

My idea was to modify Point to be immutable, since it's really only 3 floats of data, and from doing some research _new _() seems like the right function to overwrite for this. I'm not sure how to achieve this though, would it be something like this or am I way off?

def __new__(self):
    return Point(self.x, self.y, self.z)

EDIT: My bad, I realized after reading katrielalex's post that I can't modify a parameter of immutable object once it has been defined, in which case it's not a problem that both A and B point to the same data since a reassignment would require creation of a new point. I'd say that katrielalex's and vonPetrushev's posts achieve what I want, I think I'll go with vonPetrushev's solution since I don't need to rewrite all my current code to use tuples (the extra set of parentheses and not being able to reference coordinates as point.x)

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1  
"immutably in Python is often a bad idea"? who says? seems like a bad starting place :-) –  user166390 Nov 16 '10 at 23:58
    
Sorry it can be just me, but i don't understand nothing , you talk about immutable and you say in case I need to overwrite a coordinate of one but not the other later ??? in your first example you say you don't want two variable(label) refer to the same object ??? variable are not what you thing they are by the way they are a sort of label in python like dictionary key , and when you say : case it would again have a slice of point references, not points) sorry but i didn't get this part where is the problem ??? can you please be more specific about what you want to do exactly –  mouad Nov 17 '10 at 0:12
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In conjunction with katrielalex's suggestion, making the Point a named tuple would be good as well. Here I've just replaced the tuple parent with namedtuple('Point', 'x y z') - and that's enough for it to work.

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> class Point(namedtuple('Point', 'x y z')):
...     def __add__(self, other):
...             return Point((i + j for i, j in zip(self, other)))
...
...     def __mul__(self, other):
...             return sum(i * j for i, j in zip(self, other))
...
...     def __sub__(self, other):
...             return Point((i - j for i, j in zip(self, other)))
...
...     @property
...     def mod(self):
...             from math import sqrt
...             return sqrt(sum(i*i for i in self))
...

Then you can have:

>>> Point(1, 2, 3)
Point(x=1, y=2, z=3)
>>> Point(x=1, y=2, z=3).mod
3.7416573867739413
>>> Point(x=1, y=2, z=3) * Point(0, 0, 1)
3
>>> Point._make((1, 2, 3))
Point(x=1, y=2, z=3)

(Thanks to katrielalex for suggesting to extend the namedtuple rather than copying the code produced.)

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-1 It is true that making the Point a namedtuple would be good, but the way to do that is to subclass a namedtuple not to copy-and-paste all the code from collections. –  katrielalex Nov 17 '10 at 0:43
    
I think you're mistaking what namedtuple is. namedtuple is a factory function which produces classes - Point = namedtuple('Point', 'x y z') is equivalent to that whole big class statement. namedtuple produces a class which is a direct descendant of tuple. –  Chris Morgan Nov 17 '10 at 0:45
1  
@Chris: I know. So you should do named_Point = namedtuple(...) to get a namedtuple class and then class Point(named_Point): ... to make a subclass with all the added methods. Notice I said "subclass a namedtuple" =). –  katrielalex Nov 17 '10 at 0:46
    
@katrielalex: ah, I see. That would be neater. –  Chris Morgan Nov 17 '10 at 0:56
1  
+1: Named tuples is the correct way to do this. –  vonPetrushev Nov 17 '10 at 10:33
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You can make Point a subclass of tuple -- remember, the built-in types (at least in recent Pythons) are just more classes. This will give you the desired immutability.

However, I'm slightly confused about your suggested use case:

in case I need to overwrite a coordinate of one but not the other later:

That doesn't make sense if Points are immutable...


>>> class Point(tuple):
...     def __add__(self, other):
...             return Point((i + j for i, j in zip(self, other)))
...
...     def __mul__(self, other):
...             return sum(i * j for i, j in zip(self, other))
...
...     def __sub__(self, other):
...             return Point((i - j for i, j in zip(self, other)))
...
...     @property
...     def mod(self):
...             from math import sqrt
...             return sqrt(sum(i*i for i in self))
...
>>> a = Point((1,2,3))
>>> b = Point((4,5,6))
>>> a + b
(5, 7, 9)
>>> b - a
(3, 3, 3)
>>> a * b
32
>>> a.mod
3.7416573867739413
>>> a[0] = 1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'Point' object does not support item assignment
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What's wrong with this: you lost the ability to get the point attributes by name (x,y,z), and you imported a module from inside a instance method. –  vonPetrushev Nov 17 '10 at 0:09
1  
@von: there's nothing wrong with importing a module within an instance method, although in this case I just did it as a shortcut in the interpreter. There's very little overhead to excess import calls, because they are cached in sys.modules. It's true that this doesn't have the ability to refer to attributes by name, though. –  katrielalex Nov 17 '10 at 0:40
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try this:

class Point(object):
    def __init__(self, x, y, z):
        self._x=x
        self._y=y
        self._z=z

    def __getattr__(self, key):
        try:
            key={'x':'_x','y':'_y','z':'_z'}[key]
        except KeyError:
            raise AttributeError
        else:
            return self.__dict__[key]

    def __setattr__(self, key, value):
        if key in ['_x','_y','_z']:
            object.__setattr__(self, key, value)
        else:
            raise TypeError("'Point' object does not support item assignment")

So, you can construct a Point object, but not change its attributes.

share|improve this answer
    
Your raise line is completely broken. –  Chris Morgan Nov 17 '10 at 0:13
    
@Chris, @von: fixed. –  katrielalex Nov 17 '10 at 0:48
3  
-1. An attempt to actually instantiate this will call the __setattr__ which will raise a TypeError! –  aaronasterling Nov 17 '10 at 1:59
2  
You're all right - this answer was wrong. I fixed the broken stuff, but I don't like this. Named tuples was the right thing to do. –  vonPetrushev Nov 17 '10 at 10:31
    
You don't actually need the check in __setattr__; if I were doing it, the way I'd do it would be object.__setattr__(self, '_x', x) etc. in __init__. That highlights even more that it's not really immutable, and why extending tuple is better (and genuinely immutable). –  Chris Morgan Nov 17 '10 at 11:45
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