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Many times, I'm writing a function which will return true on success and false on error/failure, and essentially wrapping another function which does the same.

An example (basically language-independent, but I'll write in ECMAScript for familiarity):

function SendEmail(to, from, subject, body) {
 var eml = new EmailObj();
 eml.To = to;
 eml.From = from;
 eml.Subject = subject;
 eml.Body = body;
 return eml.Send(); // This will return true/false
}

But, sometimes, I want to do something else depending on the result of the interior function (say log specific information):

function SendEmail(to, from, subject, body) {
 var eml = new EmailObj();
 eml.To = to;
 eml.From = from;
 eml.Subject = subject;
 eml.Body = body;
 if(!eml.Send()) {
  Log("Error in send: " + eml.Response);
  return false;
 }

 return true;
}

But, I never feel like I've written good code when I do something like that.

Would you write this differently? Am I being paranoid? Or do you think this pattern in and of itself leads to this dilemma and I should look to see if I can change the higher-level approach(es)?

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Looks fine to me –  paullb Nov 17 '10 at 0:11
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not sure exactly why you are worried about it, but another option is this:

var ret = eml.Send();
if (!ret)
  Log("Error in send: " + eml.Response);
return ret;
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If the language supports it (JavaScript does) you can also consider Exception Handling.

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