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All I did was I added a single more argument (iterations) to this function:

/**
 * saveImage : save the last image received.
 * @param pName name of the file
 */
void GVMsample::saveImageLocal(const std::string& pName, const std::string& pImageFormat, const int &iterations) {

  // Check that a video module has been registered.
  if (!fRegisteredToVim) {
    throw ALError(getName(), "saveImageLocal()",  "No video module is currently "
      "registered! Call registerToVIM() first.");
  }

#ifdef GENERICVIDEOMODULE_IS_REMOTE_ON
  // If this module is running in remote mode, we shouldn't use saveImageLocal.
  throw ALError(getName(), "saveImageLocal()", "Module is run in remote mode, "
    "use saveImageRemote instead !");
#else

  ALImage* imageIn = NULL;

  for ( int iter = 0; iter < iterations; iter++ )
  {
      // Now you can get the pointer to the video structure.
      imageIn = (ALImage*) (fCamProxy->call<int>("getImageLocal", fGvmName));

      if (!imageIn) {
        throw ALError(getName(), "saveImageLocal", "Invalid image returned.");
      }

      fLogProxy->info(getName(), imageIn->toString());

      // You can get some image information that you may find useful.
      const int width = imageIn->fWidth;
      const int height = imageIn->fHeight;
      const int nbLayers = imageIn->fNbLayers;
      const int colorSpace = imageIn->fColorSpace;
      const long long timeStamp = imageIn->fTimeStamp;
      const int seconds = (int)(timeStamp/1000000LL);

      // Set the buffer we received to our IplImage header.
      fIplImageHeader->imageData = (char*)imageIn->getFrame();

      saveIplImage(fIplImageHeader, pName, pImageFormat, seconds);

      // send image over UDP to the PC
      // we will use udt
  }

  // Now that you're done with the (local) image, you have to release it from the V.I.M.
  fCamProxy->call<int>("releaseImage", fGvmName);

#endif
}

The functions is defined like this in the header file:

/**
 * saveImage : save the last image received.
 * @param pName name of the file
 */
void saveImageLocal(const std::string& pName, const std::string& imageFormat, const int &iterations);

And I am getting this error:

alt text

When I take that argument away it compiles ok again.

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2  
I take it you've tried cleaning and rebuilding from scratch? –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 17 '10 at 0:36
2  
looks like you are not actually changing the .h file. YOu sure you are editing the right one. Try putting FOOOOBAAAR in it just to see if the compiler barfs on that –  pm100 Nov 17 '10 at 0:37
    
@Oli Not really. This is not my function. It is a function from a library I am using and I don't want to edit its files unless absolutely necessary. –  Richard Knop Nov 17 '10 at 1:07
1  
PLEASE don't pass ints by const reference. It is POINTLESS. Pass them by value. They fit in a register on any 32-bit architecture. Arguably, passing by const reference can be a pessimization on naive compilers. –  Nathan Ernst Nov 17 '10 at 1:20
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2 Answers

As the error says, the prototype on line 51 of gvnsample.h is wrong. You forgot to update it, or you modified the wrong file.

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The line 51 is showed in my second code snippet. –  Richard Knop Nov 17 '10 at 0:38
2  
As pm100 said, you're probably not editing the right file. –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 17 '10 at 0:40
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok. I have figured out the problem. I was editing the right file. But...

I was editing the file in Windows 7 in a folder shared with Ubuntu 10.10. I was then trying to compile the program in Ubuntu through VirtualBox.

The problem was for some reason I need to reboot the virtual machine or else the files in the shared folder don't get updated when I rewrite them in Windows (when I rewrite a file in Ubuntu the changes are visible in Windows right away but the other way around reboot is needed - strange).

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Wow, that sort of shared folder setup sounds like a recipe for disaster. Aside from phantom updates, you'll have problems with line endings and timestamps and all kinds of things. Have you considered a DVCS such as Git? –  Greg Hewgill Nov 17 '10 at 1:17
    
Nope, it can certainly work. You have to treat the two systems as two distinct systems, though: export the drive as a network share in Windows and mount it as a Samba share in Ubuntu. Both sides understand that networked drives can change unexpectedly. –  MSalters Nov 17 '10 at 9:47
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