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In python we can say:

if foo < bar < baz:
    do something.

and similarly, we can overload the comparision operators like:

class Bar:
    def __lt__(self, other):
        do something else

but what methods of the types of the operands of those interval comparisions are actually called? is the above equivalent to

if foo.__lt__(bar) and bar.__lt__(baz):
    do something.

Edit: re S.Lott, Here's some output that helps to illustrate what actually happens.

>>> class Bar:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        print('__init__', self.name)
    def __lt__(self, other):
        print('__lt__', self.name, other.name)
        return self.name < other.name

>>> Bar('a') < Bar('b') < Bar('c')
('__init__', 'a')
('__init__', 'b')
('__lt__', 'a', 'b')
('__init__', 'c')
('__lt__', 'b', 'c')
True
>>> Bar('b') < Bar('a') < Bar('c')
('__init__', 'b')
('__init__', 'a')
('__lt__', 'b', 'a')
False
>>> 
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+1: You could (and did) answer your own question. -1: You certainly didn't need to ask this here, since finding the answer was clearly easier and quicker than asking. –  S.Lott Nov 17 '10 at 12:01
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are correct:

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
    def __lt__(self, other):
        print('__lt__', self.name, other.name)
        return True

a,b,c = Bar('a'), Bar('b'), Bar('c')

a < b < c

Output:

('__lt__', 'a', 'b')
('__lt__', 'b', 'c')
True
share|improve this answer
    
to a certain extent, i'm also very interested in wether and is being used, or some other clever thing is also going on. –  IfLoop Nov 17 '10 at 2:07
    
With some testing, it looks like it must do something essentially similar. I can arrange for the second comparison to be short circuited by having the first be false. –  IfLoop Nov 17 '10 at 2:11
    
@TokenMacGuy: As you can see in my second example, it's a little bit more than a simple and, since bar could be a mutating function. –  Mike Axiak Nov 17 '10 at 2:12
1  
I accepted this answer because it gave me enough code to use in the interactive interpreter to give me all the info I actually needed, though both answers were very informative. –  IfLoop Nov 17 '10 at 2:35
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if foo < bar < baz:

is equivalent to

if foo < bar and bar < baz:

with one important distinction: if bar is a mutating, it will be cached. I.e.:

if foo < bar() < baz:

is equivalent to

tmp = bar()
if foo < tmp and tmp < baz:

But to answer your question, it will end up being:

if foo.__lt__(bar) and bar.__lt__(baz):
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Wow, first three lines of my post was going to be the same as yours, excepting a single colon. +1 to you. ;) –  Nathan Ernst Nov 17 '10 at 2:05
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It uses successive calls to the less-than comparison operator:

>>> import dis
>>> def foo(a,b,c):
...     return a < b < c
... 
>>> dis.dis(foo)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (a)
              3 LOAD_FAST                1 (b)
              6 DUP_TOP             
              7 ROT_THREE           
              8 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             11 JUMP_IF_FALSE            8 (to 22)
             14 POP_TOP             
             15 LOAD_FAST                2 (c)
             18 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             21 RETURN_VALUE        
        >>   22 ROT_TWO             
             23 POP_TOP             
             24 RETURN_VALUE        
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+1 for generated code. This merely reinforces that the cutsy syntax I had planned for a class won't happen safely. But I learned so much it was worth looking into. –  IfLoop Nov 17 '10 at 6:12
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It calls the special method __lt__(), and if needed it will call __nonzero__() to coerce the result of __lt__() to a boolean. Surprisingly (to me at least), there is no __and__() method to override the and operator.

Here's a test program:

#!/usr/bin/env python

class Bar:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __lt__(self, other):
        print "%s.__lt__(%s)" % (self, other)
        return Bar("%s.__lt__(%s)" % (self, other))

    def __nonzero__(self):
        print "%s.__nonzero__()" % (self)
        return True

    def __str__(self):
        return self.value

foo = Bar("foo")
bar = Bar("bar")
baz = Bar("baz")

if foo < bar < baz:
    pass

Output:

foo.__lt__(bar)
foo.__lt__(bar).__nonzero__()
bar.__lt__(baz)
bar.__lt__(baz).__nonzero__()
share|improve this answer
    
and isn't an operator in this context, it's a mechanism to describe control flow (obviously in another context there's a bitwise and, for which there is a proper operator and an __and__ override). Keep in mind that and doesn't actually compare anything, it just evaluates each member of the expression for truth, and when it finds one that's false it bails out. Asking for a method to override and is like asking for a method to override if. –  Nick Bastin Nov 17 '10 at 4:51
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