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In my app I have

Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
Application.ProcessMessages;
try
...

finally
  Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
  Application.ProcessMessages;
end;

But this simply isn't working as expected. It seems to immediately change back to crDefault when it is processing.

After some Googling I decided to try Windows.SetCursor() - but I've searched the MSDN and I can't find the list of cursor types.

Update I thought I found the solution (using SetSystemCursor(Screen.Cursors[crHourGlass], OCR_NORMAL);) but I can't seem to then change the cursor back to normal :(.

share|improve this question
1  
With no more detail in your question, what I can say is: If it seems to immediately change back to crDefault, maybe the code inside try clause is changing it back (or calling some code that makes that change) or maybe it uses some kind of asynchronous process, for example start another thread who in fact is the one that process the thing. So the program executes the finally part and changes the cursor back to crDefault almost immediately. – jachguate Nov 17 '10 at 3:15
    
Jachguate> No what seems to be happening is that setting the cursor only has an effect when the application has proper focus - but any processes that happen outside the application - such as calling a DLL process or asking a scanner to scan (Note: I am scanning without any pop-up form that shows the scanner's progress etc etc) - then Windows restores the default cursor. So I think I need a way to set the cursor IN WINDOWS for all applications until my process is finished. – Richard Woolf Nov 17 '10 at 3:22
1  
"So I think I need a way to set the cursor IN WINDOWS for all applications until my process is finished" - That's a pretty bizarre requirement. It's only your application that's busy. why would you want other applications to appear to be busy when they're not? – Roddy Nov 17 '10 at 12:13
    
"It's only your application that's busy. why would you want other applications to appear to be busy when they're not?" Well how else am I to solve the problem? When I press a button I set screen.cursor := crHourglass; I then get my scanner to acquire an image - this causes the application to lose focus for 10 seconds while it waits for scanning to finish (note: as mentioned, it loses focus without any 'new windows' etc) then it calls a DLL which again, causes the application to lose focus. During all this 'lose focus' time, the cursor resolves back to crDefault (arrow). – Richard Woolf Nov 17 '10 at 13:05
    
@Richard: You can always run your application step by step, while IDE doesn't overlap with your window and check for the cursor while you execute each line of your code, checking which particular line changes it back to crDefault. Then trace into that line and follow code until you find the guilty instruction. Maybe it's really the scanner dll call... thus you can't do anything to make it the right way, but chances there's something in your code or third party libraries you can change or work-around. BTW: use the @ before my name in comments if you want me to be notified about your replies. – jachguate Nov 17 '10 at 23:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think I have the solution:

Here is how to change the cursor for 'the whole desktop' - not just for your application:

SetSystemCursor(Screen.Cursors[crDefault], OCR_NORMAL);

But be warned: any other applications/windows that want to change cursors will do so - so this is only effective if your user doesn't mess around with other applications while YOUR application is busy. As an over-ride, you could temporarily change all your systems default cursors to the cursor you want - and change them all back after the process.

I am still disappointed at the MSDN for not providing its cursor types for SetCursor - but fortunately I didn't end up having to use it.

Update: This seems to be the right track, but I can't seem to change the cursor back after SetSystemCursor(Screen.Cursors[crHourGlass], OCR_NORMAL); If anybody's reading this, I would appreciate if you take a moment to provide me with some working code - that 1. Sets the System Cursor to an hourglass, and then back to an arrow.

edit: Sample code for reverting back to default cursor:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  cArrow, cHour: HCURSOR;
begin
  cArrow := CopyImage(Screen.Cursors[crArrow], IMAGE_CURSOR, 0, 0, LR_COPYFROMRESOURCE);
  cHour := CopyImage(Screen.Cursors[crHourGlass], IMAGE_CURSOR, 0, 0, LR_COPYFROMRESOURCE);
  if (cArrow <> 0) and (cHour <> 0) and SetSystemCursor(cHour, OCR_NORMAL) then
    try

      // do processing

    finally
      SetSystemCursor(cArrow, OCR_NORMAL);
    end;
end;
share|improve this answer
3  
MSDN wouldn't mention cursor types in SetCursor because SetCursor doesn't accept cursor types. It expects a cursor handle, so it refers to the various functions that can give you one of those, including CreateCursor and LoadCursor. The latter does mention the various built-in cursors. And if that's enough, you can follow the other links in MSDN to visit the topic overview for cursors. – Rob Kennedy Nov 17 '10 at 3:55
    
Thanks Rob - you're indeed correct, I see that now. – Richard Woolf Nov 17 '10 at 12:01
    
As per my update above, this seems to be the right track but I can't change my cursor BACK to the normal arrow. – Richard Woolf Nov 17 '10 at 12:01
1  
I've edited your answer to include a simple sample. – Sertac Akyuz Nov 21 '10 at 3:30
    
@Sertac Akyuz Thank-you for that sample, it's great and works. – Richard Woolf Nov 24 '10 at 13:20

I had the same problem on my application and the solution that worked for me was to call the Application.ProcessMessages in the form constructor

here is my test application:

// MainFormUnit
type
  TMainForm = class(TForm)
    btnClickMe: TButton;
    procedure btnClickMeClick(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  MainForm: TMainForm;

implementation

uses
  LazyFormUnit;

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TMainForm.btnClickMeClick(Sender: TObject);
var
  oLazyForm: TLazyForm
begin
  oLazyForm := TLazyForm.Create(Self, 0);
  oLazyForm.ShowModal;
  oLazyForm.Free;
end;

and the second form

// LazyFormUnit
type
  TLazyForm = class(TForm)
    procedure FormShow(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    constructor Create(p_oComponent: TComponent; p_nValue: Integer); reintroduce;
  end;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

constructor TLazyForm.Create(p_oComponent: TComponent; p_nValue: Integer);
begin
  inherited Create(p_oComponent);
  Application.ProcessMessages;
end;

procedure TLazyForm.FormShow(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;
  Application.ProcessMessages;
  try
    Sleep(1000 * 5);
  finally
    Screen.Cursor := crDefault;
  end;
end;

This solution will keep the system cursor unchanged.

share|improve this answer

Depends on what's in your try block. If that doesn't take any time, then the cursor will change back right away. If you put a debug statement right before the finally, you should see it execute before the cursor returns to crDefault.

Also, you should not necessarily assume that the cursor was crDefault when you start your routine. A safe method is:

var
  C: TCursor;

begin

  C : = Screen.Cursor;
  Screen.Cursor := crHourGlass;

  try
    // long running code here
  finally
    Screen.Cursor := C;
  end;

end;

And, finally (if you'll excuse the expression), you do not need Application.ProcessMessages if the purpose you're using it for is to make sure the changed cursor is shown.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank-you, but it's simply not working. And yes there's a lot of processing that takes place in the try..finally block, in fact there's procedures in the try..finally that call other procedures etc - some of these procedure might take the focus away from the application temporarily, such as getting a scanner to scan (the application will wait for the scan) and obviously during that time my cursor is NOT an hourglass. How can I force this? – Richard Woolf Nov 17 '10 at 3:15
    
Have you traced it? Your code will change the cursor. It's possible that some code early in the try block — your own or from a library (the scanner?) — contains code to again change the cursor. If that code makes the same assumption that yours does (that the cursor should go back to crDefault rather than what is was when the code was called) that could explain the apparent behavior. – Larry Lustig Nov 17 '10 at 3:22

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