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Given the following tables:

CREATE TABLE Employees
(
  first_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  last_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  birth_date DATE NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (first_name, last_name)
);

CREATE TABLE Managers
(
  first_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  last_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  salary INTEGER NOT NULL,
  total_bonus INTEGER NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (first_name, last_name),
  CONSTRAINT managers_employees_fk FOREIGN KEY (first_name, last_name) REFERENCES Employees (first_name, last_name)
);

CREATE TABLE Workers
(
  first_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  last_name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  wage INTEGER NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (first_name, last_name),
  CONSTRAINT workers_employees_fk FOREIGN KEY (first_name, last_name) REFERENCES Employees (first_name, last_name)
);

how would you implement the entity and composite primary key classes using JPA 1.0 @IdClass annotations?

Sub questions arising are:

  1. Do sub classes define their own ID classes?
  2. If so, do they inherit from the super class' ID class?
  3. Do sub classes get @IdClass annotations?

Note the question is intentionally naive. I'd like to see the class declarations, properties with field access annotations without getters and setters will probably suffice.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Note that (first_name, last_name) is a bad idea for a PRIMARY KEY. See this article. I personally know at least one person without a first name. –  Simon Richter May 9 '11 at 11:52
    
This is just examplary and not a real chosen key. I know the implications but thanks. –  Kawu May 9 '11 at 16:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

PK is defined in the root of the inheritance tree. The root defines all.

The spec says The primary key must be defined on the entity class that is the root of the entity hierarchy or on a mapped superclass that is a (direct or indirect) superclass of all entity classes in the entity hierarchy. The primary key must be defined exactly once in an entity hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
    
So as a consequence of that, inheritance relationships / sub tables may never extend the set of primary key columns??? –  Kawu Nov 17 '10 at 12:34
    
Yes, updated answer to reflect the spec wording –  DataNucleus Nov 17 '10 at 13:29
    
Okay this also means sub classes don't get any @IdClass annotations? –  Kawu Nov 17 '10 at 13:41
    
Exactly. You cannot define "once in an entity hierarchy", define it "in the root class", and then also define in the subclass. –  DataNucleus Nov 17 '10 at 16:25

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