Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to use recursion in an iterator implementing System.Collections.IEnumerable? I have a tree structure declared roughly like this:

public class Node
{
    public Node Sibling;
    public Node Child;
}

I would like to iterate over the nodes in a tree. I would like to do something like this (pseudocode, I guess this won't compile):

public class NodeIterator : System.Collections.IEnumerable
{
    Node m_root;

    public System.Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        recursiveYield(m_root);
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumeraton recursiveYield(Node node)
    {
        yield return node;
        if (node.Child)
        {
            recursiveYield(node.Child);
        }
        if (node.Sibling)
        {
            recursiveYield(node.Sibling);
        }
    }
}

Is this somehow possible? I realise this can be solved without recursion using a Node deque in the GetEnumerator function.

share|improve this question
    
Should work. Did you try this out ? the clients should not care how it is implemented - it just has to be able to iterate through the receiver. If recursion makes your code simpler, use it. – Gishu Nov 17 '10 at 6:40
1  
@Gishu - should work (aside from IEnumeraton), but it ignores the return value of recursiveYield(node.Child) and recursiveYield(node.Sibling). – Kobi Nov 17 '10 at 6:42
2  
Not exactly a duplicate, but C# Performance of nested yield in a tree shows some solutions and discusses some performance implications. – Albin Sunnanbo Nov 17 '10 at 7:08
    
@Albin Sunnanbo: Exactly! +1 – ivo s Nov 17 '10 at 7:21
up vote 19 down vote accepted

Yes, all you need is to iterate the return value from the call site. Like so:

IEnumerable<T> Recursive(Node node)
{
    yield return node;
    foreach (var siblingNode in Recursive(node.Sibling))
    {
        yield return siblingNode;
    }
    foreach (var childNode in Recursive(node.Child))
    {
        yield return childNode;
    }
}

For the record, this isn't better than using a queue to achieve e.g. breadth-first traversal. The memory requirement for something like this is identical in the worst case.

share|improve this answer
    
Do I need to create an iterator at all or would it be possible to create a static function which recursively yields the different values: static IEnumberable<T> Recursive(Node node) and then at client foreach(var node in Recursive(root))? – Andreas Brinck Nov 17 '10 at 6:48
2  
+1 Recursion is beautiful – Omnomnom Nov 17 '10 at 6:56
    
Hi John Leidegren, yes this is pretty beautiful - short & sweet:) But are you sure the memory requirement will be identical ? If I remember correctly checking similar code it was not at all! New ArrayList or List<T> create on every call. – ivo s Nov 17 '10 at 7:13
    
@Andreas Brinck The contextual keyword yield is used to tell the compiler that the return value of this method is a sequence of values IEnumerable<T> rather than a single value. That's why and how this works. If you implement the traversal yourself, you'll end up three times as much code. If you're asking if you don't need to implement of IEnumerable/IEnumerator yourself then that's true. This can be a static method that can be used by the client as suggested. – John Leidegren Nov 17 '10 at 7:17
    
may I add that in F# you can do this more naturally using the yield! operator (spares you from iterating over the result of the recursive invocation). – Johannes Rudolph Nov 17 '10 at 7:30

No because the recursiveYield(Node node) function would return a collection and you can only yield an item

share|improve this answer
    
While it is true (and unfortunate) you cannot combine return collection with yield return item, there's an easy workaround. – Kobi Nov 17 '10 at 6:46
    
will try:)) not sure it would work – ivo s Nov 17 '10 at 6:47
    
@Kobi: there is always workarounds but would the one in question work ???? – ivo s Nov 17 '10 at 6:48
    
Well, you should generally prefer the working workarounds :) – Kobi Nov 17 '10 at 6:50
    
That is what I usually use at work but I hope tomorrow will be the day I do it right:) Every day I hope ... maybe tomorrow:) – ivo s Nov 17 '10 at 6:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.