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I was asked by my friend to find long running queries (more than 5 second) on his oracle database. He wanted to do some sort of polling after a periodic interval and wanted to send himself an alert so that he knows which query are taking so long to execute and send query and corresponding session to him.

I wrote this Oracle query :

    select    sess.sid,
    sess.username,
    sess.paddr,
    sess.machine,
    optimizer_mode,
    sess.schemaname,
    hash_value,
    address,
    sess.sql_address,
    cpu_time,
    elapsed_time,
    sql_text
from    v$sql sql, v$session sess
where 
        sess.sql_hash_value = sql.hash_value
    and     sess.sql_address = sql.address
    and     sess.username is not null
    and     elapsed_time > 1000000  * 5
order by    
    cpu_time desc

But he says that when he runs a query manually and calculates the time, the time it spends in executing it is a fraction of the result he is getting from the table generated by this particular query.

I wonder if my query is wrong , I have done some search but it still seems the query is fine.

Database is Oracle 10g

Suggestions???

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

ELAPSED_TIME is the accumulated time for all the times that SQL statement has been run. So it will be high for frequently executed queries.

Consider this a snappy query (the HINT-style comment is for the purposes of getting the SQL_ID in V$SQLAREA):

select /*+ fast_running_query */ id
from big_table
where id = 1
/

How long does it take to run? This long:

SQL> select elapsed_time
  2         , executions
  3         , elapsed_time / executions as avg_ela_time
  4  from v$sqlarea
  5  where sql_id = '73c1zqkpp23f0'
  6  /

ELAPSED_TIME EXECUTIONS AVG_ELA_TIME
------------ ---------- ------------
      235774          1       235774

SQL> 

That's a relatively large chunk o' microsecs, because of the parse time. We can see that running it a couple more times doesn't add much to the elapsed time, and the average is much lower:

SQL> r
  1  select elapsed_time,
  2         executions,
  3         elapsed_time / executions as avg_ela_time
  4  from v$sqlarea
  5* where sql_id = '5v4nm7jtq3p2n'

ELAPSED_TIME EXECUTIONS AVG_ELA_TIME
------------ ---------- ------------
      237570          3        79190

SQL>

And after running it another 100000 times ...

SQL> r
  1  select elapsed_time,
  2         executions,
  3         elapsed_time / executions as avg_ela_time
  4  from v$sqlarea
  5* where sql_id = '5v4nm7jtq3p2n'

ELAPSED_TIME EXECUTIONS AVG_ELA_TIME
------------ ---------- ------------
     1673900     100003   14.3809724

SQL>

Now, what you wantt is to find active sessions which have been doing something continuously for more than five seconds. So you need session-level timings, and in particular the LAST_CALL_ET on V$SESSION, which is the number of seconds the session has been doing something (if its status is ACTIVE) or the total elapsed time since its last action (if its status is INACTIVE).

select sid
       , serial#
       , sql_address
       , last_call_et
from v$session
where status = 'ACTIVE'
and last_call_et > sysdate - (sysdate-(5/86400))
/

So, consider this query. It's slow:

SQL> select /*+ slow_running_query */ *
  2  from big_table
  3  where col2 like '%whatever%'
  4  /

no rows selected

Elapsed: 00:00:07.56
SQL>

That's long enough to monitor using a query on V$SESSION. This one searches for statements which have been running for more than 3 seconds...

SQL> select sid
  2         , serial#
  3         , sql_id
  4         , last_call_et
  5  from v$session
  6  where status = 'ACTIVE'
  7  and last_call_et > sysdate - (sysdate - (3/86400))
  8  and username is not null
  9  /

       SID    SERIAL# SQL_ID        LAST_CALL_ET
---------- ---------- ------------- ------------
       137          7 096rr4hppg636            4
       170          5 ap3xdndsa05tg            7

SQL>

and lo!

SQL> select sql_text from v$sqlarea where sql_id = 'ap3xdndsa05tg'
  2  /

SQL_TEXT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
select /*+ slow_running_query */ * from big_table where col2 like '%whatever%'

SQL>

"it should give me the list of queries which are currently executing or have recently finished executing and I can find the total time the query took to complete"

The LAST_ACTIVE_TIME on the V$SQLAREA view records the most recent time the statement was executed. However, there is no view which exposes the metrics for each individual execution of the statement. If you want that sort of detail you will need to start tracing. And that is a separate question.

share|improve this answer
    
So, you mean to say that if I run 2 similar queries in a single session than the elapsed_time will be the sum total of both the queries run in a single session. I was thinking of performing a join with v$sql on sql_address or hash_value to get the sql_text. Will that be fine ?? –  Egalitarian Nov 17 '10 at 9:11
    
@Egalitarian - V$SQLAREA.ELAPSED_TIME is a running total across all sessions. But the queries have to be identical not just "similar". –  APC Nov 17 '10 at 12:54
    
Is there a table in oracle which has the execution time (total) for a query run along with the time when it was run and the total time spent in executing it. What I want is when I execute that particular query it should give me the list of queries which are currently executing or have recently finished executing and I can find the total time the query took to complete. –  Egalitarian Nov 18 '10 at 8:24

Use the tracing:

# alter session set timed_statistics = true; 
# alter session set sql_trace = true; 
.....
# show parameter user_dump_dest 
$ tkprof <trc-файл> <txt-файл> 
share|improve this answer
    
This will help diagnose why a given session is taking a long time to execute a query. But that is not the question which @Egalitarian asked. –  APC Nov 17 '10 at 7:53

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