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I have the following class definitions in c++:

struct Foo {
  int x;
  char array[24];
  short* y;
};

class Bar {
  Bar();

  int x;
  Foo foo;
};

and would like to initialize the "foo" struct (with all its members) to zero in the initializer of the Bar class. Can this be done this way:

Bar::Bar()
  : foo(),
    x(8) {
}

... ?

Or what exactly does the foo(x) do in the initializer list?

Or is the struct even initialized automatically to zero from the compiler?

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3  
Note that members should be listed on initialization list in the same order as they are declared, while you declare x first but have it second on initialization list. –  Adam Badura Nov 17 '10 at 9:52
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2 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

First of all, you should (must !) read this c++ faq regarding POD and aggregates. In your case, Foo is indeed a POD class and foo() is a value initialization :

To value-initialize an object of type T means:

  • if T is a class type (clause 9) with a user-declared constructor (12.1), then the default constructor
    for T is called (and the initialization is ill-formed if T has no accessible default constructor);
  • if T is a non-union class type without a user-declared constructor, then every non-static data member and base-class component of T is value-initialized;
  • if T is an array type, then each element is value-initialized;
  • otherwise, the object is zero-initialized

So yes, foo will be zero-initialized. Note that if you removed this initialization from Bar constructor, foo would only be default-initialized :

If no initializer is specified for an object, and the object is of (possibly cv-qualified) non-POD class type (or array thereof), the object shall be default-initialized; if the object is of const-qualified type, the underlying class type shall have a user-declared default constructor. Otherwise, if no initializer is specified for a nonstatic object, the object and its subobjects, if any, have an indeterminate initial value;

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1  
What if foo was defined as a const member? –  RezaPlusPlus Sep 9 '11 at 21:41
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In standard C++ you need to make a ctor for Foo.

struct Foo {

  Foo(int const a, std::initializer_list<char> const b, short* c)
    : x(a), y(c) {
    assert(b.size() >= 24, "err");
    std::copy(b.begin(), b.begin() + 24, array);
  }

  ~Foo() { delete y; }

  int x;
  char array[24];
  short* y;
};

class Bar {

  Bar() : x(5), foo(5, {'a', 'b', ..., 'y', 'z'},
    new short(5)) { }

  private:

  int x;
  Foo foo;
};

In C++0x you may use uniform initialization list, but still you need dtor for Foo:

class Bar {

  Bar() : x(5), foo{5, new char[24]{'a', 'b', ..., 'y', 'z'},
    new short(5)} { }
  ~Bar() { delete[] foo.array; delete foo.y;}
  }
  private:

  int x;
  Foo foo;
};

To default initialize foo (as Bar() : foo(), x(8) { }) you need to give Foo a default ctor.

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2  
This is a bit unclear where you use C++03 vs C++0x. IIRC initializer_list is part of c++0x. Besides in your second codeblock you created two memory leaks. –  Fabio Fracassi Nov 17 '10 at 10:14
    
@Fabio: thanks for pointing that out, edited –  erjot Nov 17 '10 at 13:31
    
now you have one double deletion (foo.y) and one memory leak (from the new char[24], besides, I am not sure (but I might be wrong here) that this is the way to use initializer_list) –  Fabio Fracassi Nov 17 '10 at 19:03
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