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I am trying to build KD Tree (static case). We assume points are sorted on both x and y coordinates.

For even depth of recursion the set is split into two subsets with a vertical line going through median x coordinate.

For odd depth of recursion the set is split into two subsets with a horizontal line going through median y coordinate.

The median can be determined from sorted set according to x / y coordinate. This step I am doing before each splitting of the set. And I think that it causes the slow construction of the tree.

  1. Please could you help me check any and optimize the code?
  2. I can not find the k-th nearest neighbor, could somebody help me with the code?

Thank you very much for your help and patience...

Please see the sample code:

class KDNode
{
private:
Point2D *data;
KDNode *left;
KDNode *right;
    ....
};

void KDTree::createKDTree(Points2DList *pl)
{
//Create list
KDList kd_list;

//Create KD list (all input points)
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < pl->size(); i++)
{
kd_list.push_back((*pl)[i]);
}

//Sort points by x
std::sort(kd_list.begin(), kd_list.end(), sortPoints2DByY());

//Build KD Tree
root = buildKDTree(&kd_list, 1);
}


KDNode * KDTree::buildKDTree(KDList *kd_list, const unsigned int depth)
{
//Build KD tree
const unsigned int n = kd_list->size();

 //No leaf will be built
 if (n == 0)
 {
  return NULL;
 }

 //Only one point: create leaf of KD Tree
 else if (n == 1)
 {
  //Create one leaft
  return new KDNode(new Point2D ((*kd_list)[0]));
 }

 //At least 2 points: create one leaf, split tree into left and right subtree
 else
 {
  //New KD node
  KDNode *node = NULL;

  //Get median index
  const unsigned int median_index = n/2;

  //Create new KD Lists
  KDList kd_list1, kd_list2;

  //The depth is even, process by x coordinate
  if (depth%2 == 0)
  {
   //Create new median node
   node = new KDNode(new Point2D( (*kd_list)[median_index]));

   //Split list
   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < n; i++)
   {
    //Geta actual point
    Point2D *p = &(*kd_list)[i];

    //Add point to the first list: x < median.x
    if (p->getX() < (*kd_list)[median_index].getX())
    {
     kd_list1.push_back(*p);
    }

    //Add point to the second list: x > median.x
    else if (p->getX() > (*kd_list)[median_index].getX())
    {
     kd_list2.push_back(*p);
    }
   }

   //Sort points by y for the next recursion step: slow construction of the tree???
   std::sort(kd_list1.begin(), kd_list1.end(), sortPoints2DByY());
   std::sort(kd_list2.begin(), kd_list2.end(), sortPoints2DByY());

  }

  //The depth is odd, process by y coordinates
  else
  {

   //Create new median node
   node = new KDNode(new Point2D((*kd_list)[median_index]));

   //Split list
   for (unsigned int i = 0; i < n; i++)
   {
    //Geta actual point
    Point2D *p = &(*kd_list)[i];

    //Add point to the first list: y < median.y
    if (p->getY() < (*kd_list)[median_index].getY())
    {
     kd_list1.push_back(*p);
    }

    //Add point to the second list: y < median.y
    else if (p->getY() >(*kd_list)[median_index].getY())
    {
     kd_list2.push_back(*p);
    }
   }

   //Sort points by x for the next recursion step: slow construction of the tree???
   std::sort(kd_list1.begin(), kd_list1.end(), sortPoints2DByX());
   std::sort(kd_list2.begin(), kd_list2.end(), sortPoints2DByX());

  }

  //Build left subtree
  node->setLeft( buildKDTree(&kd_list1, depth +1 ) );

  //Build right subtree
  node->setRight( buildKDTree(&kd_list2, depth + 1 ) );

  //Return new node 
  return node; 
 }
}
share|improve this question
    
How is the type KDList defined? –  Björn Pollex Nov 17 '10 at 10:28
    
@Space: typedef std::vector<Point2D> KDList; –  Ian Nov 17 '10 at 10:31
    
And how is Points2DList defined? –  Björn Pollex Nov 17 '10 at 10:33
    
@Space Like KDList, but it stores some topological relations. Therefore items are moved on the KDList. –  Ian Nov 17 '10 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

The sorting to find the median is probably the worst culprit here, since that is O(nlogn) while the problem is solvable in O(n) time. You should use nth_element instead: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/nth_element/. That'll find the median in linear time on average, after which you can split the vector in linear time.

Memory management in vector is also something that can take a lot of time, especially with large vectors, since every time the vector's size is doubled all the elements have to be moved. You can use the reserve method of vector to reserve exactly enough space for the vectors in the newly created nodes, so they need not increase dynamically as new stuff is added with push_back.

And if you absolutely need the best performance, you should use lower level code, doing away with vector and reserving plain arrays instead. Nth element or 'selection' algorithms are readily available and not too hard to write yourself: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selection_algorithm

share|improve this answer

Not really an answer to your questions, but I would highly recommend the forum at http://ompf.org/forum/ They have some great discussions over there for fast kd-tree constructions in various contexts. Perhaps you'll find some inspiration over there.

Edit:
The OMPF forums have since gone down, although a direct replacement is currently available at http://igad2.nhtv.nl/ompf2/

share|improve this answer
    
No answer there... –  Ian Nov 18 '10 at 20:15
1  
Like I said, you're perhaps not directly going to find an answer there. But if you actively participate in the forums and ask your question there, you're more than likely to get a response to help you on your way. If there is one forum that discusses KD trees or other hierarchies, their properties, fast construction methods and the like at length, it's that one. –  Bart Nov 18 '10 at 20:59
    
Link in answer is gone :( –  mkb May 15 '12 at 21:24
    
@mkb Indeed. I have updated the answer with the replacement forum by Jacco Bikker at NHVT. –  Bart May 15 '12 at 21:27

Some hints on optimizing the kd-tree:

  • Use a linear time median finding algorithm, such as QuickSelect.
  • Avoid actually using "node" objects. You can store whole tree using the points only, with ZERO additional information. Essentially by just sorting an array of objects. The root node will then be in the middle. A rearrangement that puts the root first, then uses a heap layout will likely be nicer to the CPU memory cache on query time, but more tricky to build.
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