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Hey everyone. I have a file full of data, each row consists of something similiar to "755545;45634;1244". Sometimes somewhere there can occur an unknown number of additional new lines, which I dont want. Example:

256163;16816;1651
16156;165165;1165

15153;135135;15351
15153;1351;8



165;15313;153513
254;45;45

Desired output:

256163;16816;1651
16156;165165;1165    
15153;135135;15351
15153;1351;8
165;15313;153513
254;45;45

Can this be done easily with awk/sed utility in unix?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The answer from @Luixv is correct if there are no whitespace on the "empty" lines. If whitespace is present use this instead:

sed '/^[ \t]*$/d'

Thats an space before the \t within the brackets, i.e. [space\t]

If this doesn't work, you might have a problem with newlines. Do a:

$ file test_file
test_file: ISO-8859 text, with CRLF, LF line terminators

If you get the output above, convert the file to unix using:

$ dos2unix test_file
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YES YES YES! Great! Exactly. Fully working afterwards thank you! –  tsusanka Nov 17 '10 at 11:54
    
Also be careful if you're using files that came from windows. If so you may need to match the ^M (the extra windows endline character) as well as spaces and tabs. –  qwerty9967 Jul 1 '12 at 2:07
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sed '/^$/d'

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Thx for reply. I tried but it seems it add one additional new line instead of deleting them.. –  tsusanka Nov 17 '10 at 10:49
    
well, I am trying it right now and it works. Then what I am assuming is that you don't have empty lines but sumething else (may be tabs, spaces?). Right a small test file and try it. –  Luixv Nov 17 '10 at 10:56
    
Hmm, thats interesting. I tried it with my example and its working. But I apply that on the main file it looks like its not working. Could it be because of the file size (about 250Mb of pure text!). –  tsusanka Nov 17 '10 at 11:01
    
No, I don't think so. To look what is at the empty lines. If you are under a unix machine make an octal dumo (od <fileName>) in order to see if it is an empty line or not. Compare it with your test file –  Luixv Nov 17 '10 at 11:04
    
to look what is at the empty lines. If you are under a unix machine make an octal dumo (od <fileName>) in order to see if it is an empty line or not. Compare it with your test file. –  Luixv Nov 17 '10 at 11:05
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sed -nre "s/([^$])/\1/p" input
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sed -n 's/^[ ,/t]*$/!p' filename
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Since unix consider space and tab as different characters i guesws we should mention both –  Sabarish Sep 26 '12 at 13:14
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Solved with ssed super_sed if you do not have it installed, install it.

ssed -R -e '/(^$|\s)/ d' yourFile

or

cat yourFile| ssed -R -e '/(^$|\s)/ d'

Happy seding

PS: will work even if you have tabs or \r \t \n hence the \s in the ReqExp.

\r = Return Carriage
\n = New Line
\t = Tab
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