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I'm currently building a Windows Service which needs to process a queue of messages that are sat in a database table. This queue could vary in length and could take anything from 5 seconds to 55 seconds to execute against all rows in the database (I'm currently using a test data set of 500,000 records)

The Windows Service is configured to run on a 30 second timer so I have tried, unsuccessfully, to ensure that when the timer delegate runs that it is not able to run again until the previous request to the method has completed successfully

I have the following code in my Windows Service OnStart method:

     AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);
     TimerCallback timerDelegate = new TimerCallback(MessageQueue.ProcessQueue);

     Timer stateTimer = new Timer(timerDelegate, autoEvent, 1000, Settings.Default.TimerInterval); // TimerInterval is 30000

     autoEvent.WaitOne();

And the following code in MessageQueue.ProcessMessage:

      Trace.Write("Starting ProcessQueue");
      SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient("winprev-01");

      AutoResetEvent autoEvent = (AutoResetEvent)stateObject;

      foreach (MessageQueue message in AllUnprocessed)
      {
          switch (message.MessageType)
          {
              case MessageType.PlainText:
              case MessageType.HTML:
                  SendEmail(smtp, message);

                  break;

              case MessageType.SMS:
                  SendSms(message);

                  break;

              default:
                  break;
          }
      }

      autoEvent.Set();
      Trace.Write("Ending ProcessQueue");

I'm using DebugView to analyse the view the Trace statements as the Service runs and I can see multiple instances of "Starting ProcessQueue" which occur every 30 seconds which is what I am trying to avoid happening

In summary: I want to call ProcessQueue and ensure that it is not executed again unless it has completed its work (this enables me to prevent the same messages in the queue being processed multiple times

I'm sure I'm missing something pretty obvious here so any help would be much appreciated :)

Dave

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why not just set a lock/trigger at the beginning&end of your MessageQueue.ProcessMessage method, then check it before you call ProcessQueue again? –  Bolu Nov 17 '10 at 11:11
    
@Bolu: That's not a good idea. He'll have iterations of the code basically queuing up, blocking, waiting for the first to finish - then presumably they'll each in turn just run through and find nothing to do. –  Andrew Barber Nov 17 '10 at 11:27
    
What you actually want is a synchronization timer object - in Win32, it's called a waitable timer. –  wj32 Nov 17 '10 at 11:38
    
@Andrew, when I say lock/trigger I mean a simple bool value.... set it to false when start the ProcessQueue and set it to true when it's completed, other iterations just check it and break out (if it is false) –  Bolu Nov 17 '10 at 11:39
    
Actually, if he's going to use a timer here, what he should do is only have it trigger once, and reset the timer only when the work is complete... not use a ResetEvent at all. –  Andrew Barber Nov 17 '10 at 11:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why don't you have your delegate disable the timer and then re-enable it (or continue working, if timer would expire immediately) once it's through working. Provided the latency between timer firing and your delegate waking up is < 30 seconds, this should be watertight.

while (true)
{
  Trace.Write("Starting ProcessQueue")
  stateTimer.Enabled = false;
  DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

  // do the work

  // check if timer should be restarted, and for how long
  TimeSpan workTime = DateTime.Now - start;
  double seconds = workTime.TotalSeconds;
  if (seconds > 30)
  {
    // do the work again
    continue;
  }
  else
  {
     // Restart timer to pop at the appropriate time from now
     stateTimer.Interval = 30 - seconds;
     stateTimer.Enabled = true;
     break;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 ; I muddled up my answer by posting that at the very end :p –  Andrew Barber Nov 17 '10 at 12:48
    
Accepted as the answer. As both Steve and Andrew mentioned this is the correct way to go about the solution rather than just an answer to my question - thanks to you both :) –  Dave_Stott Nov 17 '10 at 13:24

Your ProcessMessage is never checking if the resetEvent is signaled - it's just running regardless.

I post here how to fix this. However, this is not the ideal method to do what you want to do. See the bottom of my answer for that.

You have your call to autoEvent.WaitOne() in the wrong place; it should be at the beginning of the ProcessMessage method.

AutoResetEvent autoEvent = (AutoResetEvent)stateObject;
autoEvent.WaitOne();
Trace.Write("Starting ProcessQueue");
SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient("winprev-01");
foreach (MessageQueue message in AllUnprocessed){

You should also use the overload that accepts a time out value (int or timespan), and returns a bool If the method returns true, that means it was signaled, so you can continue. If it times out (because another iteration is still running), you should just return and not try to run the code again.

If you do not use such an overload, what you are doing would be no different than wrapping the ProcessMessage method's code in a critical section (lock() on a global var, for instance) - additional threads would block, and then needlessly run.

AutoResetEvent autoEvent = (AutoResetEvent)stateObject;
//wait just one ms to see if it gets signaled; returns false if not
if(autoEvent.WaitOne(1)){  
    Trace.Write("Starting ProcessQueue");
    SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient("winprev-01");
    foreach (MessageQueue message in AllUnprocessed){

Note that actually, a *ResetEvent isn't ideal here. You really just want to check if an instance is already running, and abort if so. ResetEvents aren't really made for that... but I wanted to address the question of using the ResetEvent anyway.

What would probably work better is to simply shut down the timer when the callback is called, and then restart it up when you are done. That way, it's impossible for that code to be re-entered while it's still running.

You absolutely would need to wrap all the code in the callback method in a try / finally though, so that you always restart the timer after.

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+1 for answering the question but pointing me in the direction of the correct way to do the work (think I've slightly over-engineered my solution) –  Dave_Stott Nov 17 '10 at 13:25

You can trivially solve this by using a System.Threading.Timer. You make it a one-shot timer by setting its period to zero. Restart the timer in the callback. Overlapped execution of the callback is now impossible.

Since you run this so frequently, a different approach is to use a thread instead. You'll need an AutoResetEvent to signal the thread to stop in the OnStop() method. Its WaitOne() method gives you a free timer when you use the overload that takes the millisecondsTimeout argument.

Btw: note that the autoEvent.WaitOne() call in OnStart() is troublesome. It may timeout the service controller if the first email takes a long time to send. Just omit it, you got the timer started == service started.

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OnStart method

AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(true);
    while (true)
    {
        autoEvent.WaitOne();
        Thread t = new Thread(MessageQueue.ProcessMessage);             
        t.Start(autoEvent);
    }
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That will not work; the second and later iterations will still run without checking to see if the resetEvent is signaled. –  Andrew Barber Nov 17 '10 at 11:32

What you want is a synchronization timer object. In Win32 this is known as a waitable timer (unfortunately some P/invoke is required, unless I'm mistaken).

Here's what you would do:

  • Create waitable timer (make sure it's auto-reset).
  • Set waitable timer with a period of 30 seconds.
  • Loop:
  • WaitForSingleObject(waitable timer) with infinite timeout.
  • Process queue.

If the processing takes more than 30s, the timer will simply remain set until you call WaitForSingleObject on it. Additionally, if the processing takes 20s for example, the timer will be signaled after 10 more seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
That's much more involved than he needs, and in an indirect way, is what he's already done. The .NET ResetEvent objects call into the API you refer to. –  Andrew Barber Nov 17 '10 at 11:47
    
No, his code is very different in that it uses the callback functionality of the timer object instead of waiting on the timer itself. Also, why do you say the Event classes use waitable timer functions? –  wj32 Nov 17 '10 at 11:52

I think you are making this a lot harder than it needs to be. Why not just create a separate thread that spins around an infinite loop calling MessageQueue.ProcessQueue and then waiting a certain amount of time before calling it again. If it is all happening on a single thread there is no way for anything to happen in parallel.

public class YourService : ServiceBase
{
  private ManualResetEvent m_Stop = new ManualResetEvent(false);

  protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
  {
    new Thread(Run).Start();
  }

  protected override void OnStop()
  {
    m_Stop.Set();
  }

  private void Run()
  {
    while (!m_Stop.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30))
    {
      MessageQueue.ProcessMessage();
    }
  }
}
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