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I am writing a couple fo scripts that go and collect data from a number of servers, the number will grow and im trynig to future proof my scripts, but im a little stuck.

so to start off with I have a script that looks up an IP in a mysql database and then connects to each server grabs some information and then puts it into the database again.

What i have been thinknig is there is a limited amount of time to do this and if i have 100 servers it will take a little bit of time to go out to each server get the information and then push it to a db. So I have thought about either using forks or threads in perl?

Which would be the prefered option in my situation? And hs anyone got any examples?

Thanks!

Edit: Ok so a bit more inforamtion needed: Im running on Linux, and what I thought was i could get the master script to collect the db information, then send off each sub process / task to connect and gather information then push teh information back to the db.

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Windows does best with a threading model, unix is more tolerant of process creation than windows. So, you may want to consider the OS before deciding to go with fork vs threading. fork() is easier to code IMO, but more resource intensive. What OSes? –  jim mcnamara Nov 17 '10 at 12:01
    
Ok so a bit more inforamtion needed: Im running on Linux, and what I thought was i could get the master script to collect the db information, then send off each sub process / task to connect and gather information then push teh information back to the db. –  ard Nov 17 '10 at 13:11
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There is (almost) nothing wrong with using fork from Windows. –  mob Nov 17 '10 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

Forking is more "resource safe" (think database modules and so on) than threading, so you might want to end up on that road.

Depending on your platform of choice, on the other hand, you might want to avoid fork()-ing in Perl. Quote from perlfork(1):

Perl provides a fork() keyword that corresponds to the Unix system call of the same name. On most Unix-like platforms where the fork() system call is available, Perl's fork() simply calls it.

On some platforms such as Windows where the fork() system call is not available, Perl can be built to emulate fork() at the interpreter level. While the emulation is designed to be as compatible as possible with the real fork() at the level of the Perl program, there are certain important differences that stem from the fact that all the pseudo child "processes" created this way live in the same real process as far as the operating system is concerned.

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Which is best depends a lot on your needs; but for what it's worth here's my experience:

Last time I used perl's threads, I found it was actually slower and more problematic for me than forking, because:

  • Threads copied all data anyway, as a thread would, but did it all upfront
  • Threads didn't always clean up complex resources on exit; causing a slow memory leak that wasn't acceptable in what was intended to be a server
  • Several modules didn't handle threads cleanly, including the database module I was using which got seriously confused.

One trap to watch for is the "forks" library, which emulates "threads" but uses real forking. The problem I faced here was many of the behaviours it emulated were exactly what I was trying to get away from. I ended up using a classic old-school "fork" and using sockets to communicate where needed.

Issues with forks (the library, not the fork command):

  • Still confused the database system
  • Shared variables still very limited
  • Overrode the 'fork' command, resulting in unexpected behaviour elsewhere in the software
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