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Where can I find one ready for use? Or for that matter, a good collection of "standard" data structures, if you know of any?

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Why would you need a red-black tree when javascript object literals do the same thing and is likely implemented as a red-black tree in C anyway? (could also be implemented as a hash table which would have similar performance characteristics). –  slebetman Nov 17 '10 at 17:13
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To be a little pedantic: red-black trees have guaranteed log behavior, even in the worst case, but hash tables don't provide that guarantee. One other difference is that red-black trees can be made to work functionally, which might be useful depending on the application. –  dyoo Nov 8 '11 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A quick check o' the Interwebs turned up a ready-to-use implementation from Kevin Lindsey (scroll down to Red-Black Trees):

KevLinDev - Utilities

Unfortunately I don't know of a site that has a repository of ready made complex data structures.

I'm guessing they're a tad rare since people rarely use JavaScript for the kind of heavy lifting that would necessitate those kinds of complex structures...but I could be wrong.

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I'm wondering why they are rare, though, considering how ubiquitous Javascript is in general... –  Hamster Nov 17 '10 at 13:04
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This implementation is actually of an AVL-Tree, and wrongly labled as Red-Black-tree! Still O(log n), though. –  smilingthax Dec 18 '10 at 5:14

I wrote a red-black tree in javascript, available here: https://github.com/vadimg/js_bintrees or as bintrees in npm. Unlike the other implementations, it has unit tests.

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