Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is accessing a content database is not a 'best practice/advisable' or it 'should' not be done as Microsoft does not support it? I just want to know if it 'can' be done in the worst case or it 'should not be done' at all.

share|improve this question
    
what ? what is the question? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 17 '10 at 13:29
    
Oops. It is related to SharePoint. –  NLV Nov 17 '10 at 14:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For worst case scenario or any normal scenario till the time you are making readonly request to content database its fine. the only risk associated with this is since microsoft does not recommends the same they can change thier internal DB structure any time during hotfix or SP release. Be causious in accessing the data so that you do not cause any lock or dead lock type situations

share|improve this answer

Well, I wish I could give you a firm answer BUT I can say this; if you are looking for a "worst case senario" then hook your SharePoint list up to an Access db and pull it all down via a link table. That way you can copy into a 'real' table.

That is if that is what you're looking to get to.

If you're looking to just do reporting on it, then TOTALY use link tables in Access and report off of them. It'll be safe and it will be real-time.

share|improve this answer
    
No. I dont want to make a copy. I want to generate reports based on the real time data. Mirroring the DB is not going to help me. –  NLV Nov 17 '10 at 14:55
    
@NLV oh, well you can just use link table in access to do your reporting. It'll be safe and real-time. –  Keng Nov 17 '10 at 15:10
    
How well it work in a Web Farm environment? –  NLV Nov 18 '10 at 5:22
    
@NLV Seems to work fine for us...a division of top 500 company. –  Keng Nov 18 '10 at 5:39

You should not access a ContentDB directly. The access to any SharePoint DBs can void your support for the farm, and yes, this includes READING from the DB.

See: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/841057/en-us

[...] Examples of such database changes include, but are not limited to, the following: Reading from the database, manually or programmatically Adding database triggers:

Adding database triggers

Adding new indexes or changing existing indexes within tables

Adding, changing, or deleting any primary or foreign key relationships

Changing or deleting existing stored procedures

Calling existing stored procedures directly

Adding new stored procedures

Adding, changing, or deleting any data in any table of any of the databases for the products that are listed in the "Applies to" section

Adding, changing, or deleting any columns in any table of any of the databases for the products that are listed in the "Applies to" section

Making any modification to the database schema

Adding tables to any of the databases for the products that are listed in the "Applies to" section

Changing the database collation

Running DBCC_CHECKDB WITH REPAIR_ALLOW_DATA_LOSS (However, running DBCC_CHECKDB WITH REPAIR_FAST and REPAIR_REBUILD is supported, as these commands only update the indexes of the associated database.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.