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I have a local String in a method like so:

String jString = new String();

or

String jString = "";

The result is the same.

Later in the method I append:

for(int i = 0; i != someArrayList.size(); ++i) {
    jString += someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";
}

Everytime the method is run, the text from getText() gets appended to jString.

Why is this and how can I prevent it from happening? Thanks!

OK edit. This is basically what happens. Either that or you tell me it is impossible to get the results I described with this code.

public void requestData()  {
   String jString = new String();
   for(int i = 0; i != someArrayList.size(); ++i) {
      jString += someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";
      }
}

Say inside the array I have values ["a", "b", "c"]. When I run the method jString contains: a b c Next time I run it, I want it to be the new contents of the array not a b c plus the new contents.

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3  
It's hard to tell what's going on from just this snippet. Please post a short but complete program which demonstrates the problem. –  Jon Skeet Nov 17 '10 at 14:00
    
Ok modified. Please bear with me if I do something wrong. It's my first question on here. But happy to learn. –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 14:25
    
Glad that you have a good attitude about it. I appreciate a commitment to learning. –  Erick Robertson Nov 17 '10 at 14:31
    
I have to say I am stumped! This was solved so fast with the help of so many members and THE Jon Skeet commented after 5 minutes :) Thanks to all! –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 14:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

According to the code which you have written, it will add the text from the array to the jString variable which you cant prevent. But if you don't want that to happen then if you can mention about the logic of your code then according to that we can help you.

EDIT: According to your code it will work as expected by you. So i think the problem is with the array which you are accessing. ie. for the 1st if array contains a,b,c then jstring = "abc"; and for the 2nd time if array contains a,b,c,d,e, then jString="abcde";

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This is true, if you are not clearing the array between calls. –  Erick Robertson Nov 17 '10 at 14:31
    
Thats it! Facepalm. There is a class member array with objects that are added again and again inside this method. Thanks you! –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 14:32
1  
Now get that StringBuilder object in there! –  Erick Robertson Nov 17 '10 at 14:36
    
I did and it works! –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 15:04

The code you describe does exactly as you require.

public void requestData()  {
  String jString = new String();
  for(int i = 0; i != someArrayList.size(); ++i) {
    jString += someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";
  }
}

When you call this method, it will create a new (empty) jString and then append each item in the list to it, separated by a newline character. There is no way that jString could continue to carry the value from the previous call, since the variable leaves and re-enters scope when the method returns and is called again.

By the way, you should still use a StringBuilder object.

public void requestData() {
  StringBuilder jStringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
  for (int i = 0; i < someArrayList.size(); i++) {
    jStringBuilder.append(someArrayList.get(i).getText()).append('\n');
  }
  String jString = jStringBuilder.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

This is because jString variable is not local in the method and the method +=s it on every call. You should:

  1. Make it local and return the constructed value, or
  2. Use StringBuilder or StringBuffer (the best choice not to put burden to garbage collector).
share|improve this answer
    
GK pointed me to it, but I will keep the StringBuffer in mind. THX –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 14:34

Check where the jString is being defined.

Based on the results, I am guessing that you have defined it like the first code block here.

public class MyClass {
  String jString = new String();

  public void myMethod() {
    for(int i = 0; i != someArrayList.size(); ++i) {
      jString += someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";
    }
  }
}

This does not clear the jString each time the method is called. The jString is initialized when the class is instantiated. Each call to the method keeps adding on to it.

I suspect that what you really want is something like this:

public class MyClass {
  public void myMethod() {
    String jString = new String();

    for(int i = 0; i != someArrayList.size(); ++i) {
      jString += someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";
    }
  }
}

If you declare the jString inside the method, then it will clear each time.

The second example is the one where the string is "local to the method". In the first example, the string is a property of the class.

One other point of importance. When appending strings like this, it is wise to use a StringBuilder class. This will cause a lot less memory to be used when building the string. There are other questions on SO that explain why, if you are interested.

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according to the description of the question he already has a jString as a method variable. –  GuruKulki Nov 17 '10 at 14:19
    
If this is true, then the results would not be as he described. I think it's more likely that the OP is confused and is using poor terminology. –  Erick Robertson Nov 17 '10 at 14:20
    
I modified the original question. The String is a method variable. But at the same time it is very possible that I am confused and using poor terminology :) –  boston Nov 17 '10 at 14:22

remove the +

jString = someArrayList.get(i).getText() + "\n";

Will stop appending it. And just replace jString each time, but I doubt if this is what you want either.

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Is that really what he wants? –  dacwe Nov 17 '10 at 13:58
    
@dacwe don't ask me, but thats why its appending. –  NimChimpsky Nov 17 '10 at 13:59
    
This will be break the logic, since it makes a multi-row text from an array in each call. –  khachik Nov 17 '10 at 13:59
    
@NimChimpsky that's the same as jString = someArrayList.get(someArrayList.size() - 1).getText() + "\n"; –  dacwe Nov 17 '10 at 14:01
    
@khachik, yeah I know that and you know that, but thats what the question is. "I have a created a loop that appends text, I want to stop it appending text" ... –  NimChimpsky Nov 17 '10 at 14:01

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