Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a base path /whatever/foo/

and $_GET['path'] should be relative to it.

However how do I accomplish this (reading the directory), without allowing directory traversal?

eg.

/\.\.|\.\./

Will not filter properly.

share|improve this question
4  
Googler's, skip the first insecure answer and head down to ircmaxell's code. –  Xeoncross Nov 26 '13 at 22:07

4 Answers 4

Well, one option would be to compare the real paths:

$basepath = '/foo/bar/baz/';
$realBase = realpath($basepath);

$userpath = $basepath . $_GET['path'];
$realUserPath = realpath($userpath);

if ($realUserPath === false || strpos($realUserPath, $realBase) !== 0) {
    //Directory Traversal!
} else {
    //Good path!
}

Basically, realpath() will resolve the provided path to an actual hard physical path (resolving symlinks, .., ., /, //, etc)... So if the real user path does not start with the real base path, it is trying to do a traversal. Note that the output of realpath will not have any "virtual directories" such as . or .....

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this function always having problems aka being bypassed? –  Johnny Nov 17 '10 at 14:25
    
Ok maybe not... –  Johnny Nov 17 '10 at 14:26
    
What do you mean being bypassed? The function is very reliable (and in fact is the best way of getting the actual path to a file, rather than the canonical (relative) path)... –  ircmaxell Nov 17 '10 at 14:29
1  
The only proper way of doing it.. –  Rok Kralj Oct 8 '12 at 7:32
    
Editor: strpos is multi-byte safe already. Introducing the mb alternative may introduce other vulnerabilities... –  ircmaxell Feb 10 at 18:42

@ircmaxell the answer wasn't fully correct. I've seen that solution in several snippets but it has a bug which is related to the output of realpath(). The function realpath() removes the trailing directory separator, so imagine two contiguos directories such as:

/foo/bar/baz/

/foo/bar/baz_baz/

As realpath() would remove the last directory separator you method will return "good path" if $_GET['path'] was equal to "../baz_baz" as it would be something like

strpos("/foo/bar/baz_baz", "/foo/bar/baz")

Maybe:

$basepath = '/foo/bar/baz/';
$realBase = realpath($basepath);

$userpath = $basepath . $_GET['path'];
$realUserPath = realpath($userpath);

if ($realUserPath === false || strcmp($realUserPath, $realBase) !== 0 || strpos($realUserPath, $realBase . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR) !== 0) {
    //Directory Traversal!
} else {
    //Good path!
}
share|improve this answer

It is not sufficient to check for patterns like ../ or the likes. Take "../" for instance which URI encodes to "%2e%2e%2f". If your pattern check happens before a decode, you would miss this traversal attempt. There are some other tricks hackers can do to circumvent a pattern checker especially when using encoded strings.

I've had the most success stopping these by canonicalizing any path string to its absolute path using something like realpath() as ircmaxwell suggests. Only then do I begin checking for traversal attacks by matching them against a base path I've predefined.

share|improve this answer

I assume you mean without allowing users to traverse the directory yes?

If you are trying to stop your own PHP from traversing the directory you should just make the php work properly in the first place.

What you need to stop users is a modified .htaccess file...

Options -Indexes

(This all assumes you are talking about users)

share|improve this answer
    
MainMa understood what I'm trying to achieve. –  Johnny Nov 17 '10 at 14:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.