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I have never done GPU programming, but have finally acquired an Nvidia card to experiment with. However, the said card also drives my monitor. My question is whether running general purpose computing tasks on the card will negatively affect graphics performance. Can such tasks crash the card? If not, does that mean the card has an OS or some other type executive running on it?

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Long running GPU computing tasks may not crash the card, but (Windows Vista/7) if it runs for too long it will appear the system is hung. Windows (at least since Vista) detects the timeout and recovers by resetting the GPU and some state in the graphics stack.

Bing for "gpu timeout" or see this article for example. http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/display/wddm_timeout.mspx

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Thank you for this answer. –  Sabuncu Nov 17 '10 at 17:06

Running tasks on the GPU will negatively affect graphics performance, of course. What amount of degradation you will experience depends of course on the heaviness of the tasks running on the GPU. To give you a more qualified answer (please note, I have no association at all with this site) read the answer to the question "Why is my computer so slow when running Octane Render?" here: http://www.refractivesoftware.com/faq.html

Can such tasks crash the card?

No! Why??? Does your CPU crash when you run heavy tasks on it?

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Please note that I asked if the "card" would crash. In an OS environment, one reason for a crash would be illegal memory access. I was indirectly asking if the same could happen on the graphics card. –  Sabuncu Nov 17 '10 at 17:05

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