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not sure if this is possible without having to go through several passes, but I'll ask anyway (my XSL is a little rusty)

I have an XML document, which contains nodes as follows:

<structures>
 <structure id="STRUCT_A">
   <field idref="STRUCT_B" name="b"/>
   <field idref="STRUCT_C" name="c"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_D" name="d"/>
 </structure>

 <structure id="STRUCT_B">
   <field idref="STRUCT_C" name="c"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_E" name="e"/>
 </structure>

 <structure id="STRUCT_C">
   <field idref="FIELD_E" name="e"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_F" name="f"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_G" name="g"/>
 </structure>
</structures>

(The real file contains lots of structure tags which interdependencies, none of which are circular!)

What I want to do is to generate some text (in this case C++ structs), and the obvious requirement is the order of the structs, so my ideal output would be

struct STRUCT_C
{
  FIELD_E e;
  FIELD_F f;
  FIELD_G g;
};

struct STRUCT_B
{
  STRUCT_C c;
  FIELD_E e;
};

struct STRUCT_A
{
  STRUCT_B b;
  STRUCT_C c;
  FIELD_D d;
};

I know I could use forward declarations and that would mean that the order doesn't matter, however the problem is that there will be "processing" code inline in the structures, and they would require the real definition to be present.

So far I can detect to see if a structure has any dependencies, with the following bit of xsl:

<xsl:for-each select="descendant::*/@idref">
  <xsl:variable name="name" select="."/>
  <xsl:apply-templates select="//structure[@id = $name]" mode="struct.dep"/> 
</xsl:for-each>

(this happens inside a <xsl:template match="structure">)

Now, theoretically, I could then follow this dependency "chain" and generate the structs for each entry first, then the one that I am currently at, however as you can imagine, this generates lot's of copies of the same structure - which is a pain..

Is there anyway to avoid the copies? Basically, once a structure has been visited, and if we visit again, not to bother outputting the code for it... I don't need the full xslt to do this (unless it's trivial!), but just any ideas on approaches...

If there isn't, I could in theory wrap the struct with a #ifdef/#define/#endif guard so that the compiler only uses the first definition, however this is REALLY NASTY! :(

(NOTES: xslt 1.0, xsltproc on linux: Using libxml 20623, libxslt 10115 and libexslt 812)

share|improve this question
    
Excellent question, +1. See my answer for a complete and short solution. :) – Dimitre Novatchev Nov 17 '10 at 17:45
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vLeafs" select="/*/structure[not(field/@idref = /*/structure/@id)]"/>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
  <xsl:apply-templates select="$vLeafs[1]">
   <xsl:with-param name="pVisited" select="'|'"/>
  </xsl:apply-templates>

 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="structure">
   <xsl:param name="pVisited"/>

struct <xsl:value-of select="@id"/>
{<xsl:text/>
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
};
  <xsl:variable name="vnewVisited"
       select="concat($pVisited, @id, '|')"/>
  <xsl:apply-templates select=
  "../structure[not(contains($vnewVisited, concat('|', @id, '|')))
              and
                not(field/@idref
                           [not(contains($vnewVisited, concat('|', ., '|')) )
                          and
                           . = ../../../structure/@id
                           ]
                   )
               ] [1]
  ">
   <xsl:with-param name="pVisited" select="$vnewVisited"/>
  </xsl:apply-templates>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="field">
  <xsl:value-of select="concat('&#xA;   ', @idref, ' ', @name, ';')"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<structures>
 <structure id="STRUCT_A">
   <field idref="STRUCT_B" name="b"/>
   <field idref="STRUCT_C" name="c"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_D" name="d"/>
 </structure>

 <structure id="STRUCT_B">
   <field idref="STRUCT_C" name="c"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_E" name="e"/>
 </structure>

 <structure id="STRUCT_C">
   <field idref="FIELD_E" name="e"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_F" name="f"/>
   <field idref="FIELD_G" name="g"/>
 </structure>
</structures>

produces the wanted, correct result:

struct STRUCT_C
{
   FIELD_E e;
   FIELD_F f;
   FIELD_G g;
};


struct STRUCT_B
{
   STRUCT_C c;
   FIELD_E e;
};


struct STRUCT_A
{
   STRUCT_B b;
   STRUCT_C c;
   FIELD_D d;
};

Explanation: structure elements are processed strictly one by one. At any time we process the first structure element whose id isn't yet registered in the pVisited parameter and that has no field/@idref value that isn't already in the pVisited parameter and refers to an existing structure element.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 good approach: process from the leaves up, so that you don't have to modify and pass as much state information. I'm still digesting your answer... – LarsH Nov 17 '10 at 17:58
    
+1, works for me, now need to map it to the real xml document I have, that'll be fun! Thanks v. much gents! – Nim Nov 17 '10 at 18:05
    
@Dimitre: +1 Very good answer! – user357812 Nov 17 '10 at 18:16
    
@LarsH: This is not from the leaves, but from the root. – user357812 Nov 17 '10 at 18:31
    
@Alej: what I mean is that in the "/*" template, @Dimitre applies templates only to the first leaf structure, i.e. structure that has no dependencies. The "structure" template then recurses on structures that have no unmet dependencies once the current structure has been defined. Thus he is working from the leaves to the roots, if you consider the structures as a "grove" where the "child" relationship models a struct dependency relationship. – LarsH Nov 17 '10 at 20:18

Just for fun, other approach (level by level) and ussing keys:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="text"/>
    <xsl:key name="kStructById" match="structure" use="@id"/>
    <xsl:key name="kStructByIdref" match="structure" use="field/@idref"/>
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:param name="pParents" select="/.."/>
        <xsl:param name="pChilds"
                   select="structures/structure[not(key('kStructById',
                                                        field/@idref))]"/>
        <xsl:variable name="vParents" select="$pParents|$pChilds"/>
        <xsl:variable name="vChilds"
                      select="key('kStructByIdref',$pChilds/@id)
                                 [count(key('kStructById',
                                             field/@idref) |
                                        $vParents) =
                                  count($vParents)]"/>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="$pChilds"/>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="current()[$vChilds]">
            <xsl:with-param name="pParents" select="$vParents"/>
            <xsl:with-param name="pChilds" select="$vChilds"/>
        </xsl:apply-templates>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="structure">
        <xsl:value-of select="concat('struct ',@id,'&#xA;{&#xA;')"/>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
        <xsl:text>};&#xA;</xsl:text>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="field">
        <xsl:value-of select="concat('&#x9;',@idref,' ',@name,';&#xA;')"/>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Output:

struct STRUCT_C
{
    FIELD_E e;
    FIELD_F f;
    FIELD_G g;
};
struct STRUCT_B
{
    STRUCT_C c;
    FIELD_E e;
};
struct STRUCT_A
{
    STRUCT_B b;
    STRUCT_C c;
    FIELD_D d;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I'm not sure I've ever seen a "/" template apply templates to "/" recursively. :-) – LarsH Nov 18 '10 at 2:59
    
@LarsH: Ja! That is the same as ussing template references. But in this case is just an esoteric form to avoid one xsl:if... – user357812 Nov 18 '10 at 12:42

Ooh, this is more complicated than it looked at first. +1 for good question.

I think the best way to accomplish this in XSLT 1.0 would be to pass an accumulating parameter whenever you apply-templates to a structure. The parameter (call it "$visited-structures") is a space-delimited list of names of structures you've already processed.

Update: finally got this. :-)

In the template for processing a structure, check whether any other structures this one depends on are not already listed in $visited-structures. If not, generate the code for this structure, and recurse on the template selecting the next non-visited structure, appending the current structure name to the $visited-structures parameter. Otherwise, don't generate code for the structure but recurse on the template selecting the first dependency structure, passing the $visited-structures parameter unmodified.

Here is the code...

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
   version="1.0">
   <xsl:key name="structuresById" match="/*/structure" use="@id" />

   <xsl:template match="structures">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="structure[1]" >
         <!-- a space-delimited list of id's of structures already processed, with space
            at beginning and end. Could contain duplicates. -->
         <xsl:with-param name="visited-structures" select="' '"/>
      </xsl:apply-templates>
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="structure">
      <xsl:param name="visited-structures" select="' '" />  
      <xsl:variable name="dependencies" select="key('structuresById', field/@idref)
                     [not(contains($visited-structures, @id))]"/>
      <xsl:choose>
         <xsl:when test="$dependencies">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="$dependencies[1]">
               <xsl:with-param name="visited-structures" select="$visited-structures"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>            
         </xsl:when>
         <xsl:otherwise>
            <!-- Now generate code for this structure ... ... -->
struct <xsl:value-of select="@id"/>
{
<xsl:apply-templates select="field"/>};
            <xsl:variable name="new-visited" select="concat(' ', @id, $visited-structures)"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="/*/structure[not(contains($new-visited, @id))][1]" >
               <xsl:with-param name="visited-structures" select="$new-visited"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>
         </xsl:otherwise>
      </xsl:choose>      
   </xsl:template>

   <xsl:template match="field">
      <xsl:value-of select="concat('  ', @idref, ' ', @name, ';&#xa;')"/>      
   </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

And the output:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

struct STRUCT_C
{
  FIELD_E e;
  FIELD_F f;
  FIELD_G g;
};


struct STRUCT_B
{
  STRUCT_C c;
  FIELD_E e;
};


struct STRUCT_A
{
  STRUCT_B b;
  STRUCT_C c;
  FIELD_D d;
};
share|improve this answer
    
P.S. You also have to pass an additional parameter to the template for <structure>, telling it whether or not to recurse on the following sibling. This would only be true at the top level, i.e. when applied in the template for processing <structures>. – LarsH Nov 17 '10 at 16:48
    
variable that's passed sounds like an idea, however will there not be a scope problem? i.e. each root structure node is called with a blank $visited-structures? Hence there will still be multiple copies of the structure nodes? – Nim Nov 17 '10 at 17:24
    
Wow, it looks like you even have to pass around a "continuation"! Or at least a list of structures yet to process. – LarsH Nov 17 '10 at 17:43
    
@Nim, the template for structures only applies templates to the first structure child (and passes a blank $visited-structures). That template then passes its expanded $visited-structures when applying templates to its following-sibling. etc. – LarsH Nov 17 '10 at 17:45
    
@LarsH, I've accepted @Dimitre's answer as it does what I need, thank you for your effort though! – Nim Nov 17 '10 at 17:54

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