Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a master collection of items with unique ID's. At some point I have a subset of IDs from the master list that belong to some sub grouping if you will. The subset is just a reference of IDs of items that exist in the master list. Is there a way I can ask the master list for just the items that match the IDs in my subset without having to loop through the entire master collection? Just trying to find the fastest way to do this rather than the standard loop.

   //go through master list and determine which items belong to this sub item grouping
    for (var item = 0; item < masterListItems.length; ++item ) {
      for (var subItem = 0; subItem < subItems.length; ++subItem ) {
         if (masterListItems[item].Id == subItems[subItem].Id) { //if it is a sub item
           //do some UI specific thing
         }
      }
    } 
share|improve this question
    
Can you display some example of the data structures and not only the way you access them currently? –  Anders Nov 17 '10 at 15:43
    
Sometimes I wonder what fastest means here... –  syockit Nov 17 '10 at 18:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a solution with jQuery.grep. Filtering in 3 lines :

var master = [{ Id: 3 },{ Id: 1 },{ Id: 2 }]
var ids = [{ Id: 1 },{ Id: 3 }];

$(document).ready(function()
{
// Filtering with 3 lines
    idList = [];
    $.each(ids,function(index,value) { idList[idList.length] = value.Id; });
    elems = $.grep(master,function(element){ return idList.indexOf(element.Id) > -1; });

    $.each(elems,function(index,value){
        alert(value.Id);
    });
});

Edit: Be careful, on Internet Explorer, you will have to define indexOf yourself, as this example :

if(!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function(needle) {
        for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
            if(this[i] === needle) {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice. i was actually hoping for a jquery solution. thanks. i'll try this. –  tote Nov 17 '10 at 16:26
    
Someone downgraded it. Can you tell why ? –  JB Jansen Nov 17 '10 at 19:20
    
seems to be because of the use of indexOf. works in IE 7 for me without defining indexOf myself. –  tote Nov 17 '10 at 21:35
    
Still a pretty good way to do it, even with an additional definition for IE6, dont you think ? –  JB Jansen Nov 18 '10 at 10:51
    
i like it. it's exactly what i was looking for. –  tote Nov 18 '10 at 14:00

You can run over the master list once to create "mapping" of the "Id" then one loop over the subset items:

var masterListMapping = new Array();
for (var i = 0; i < masterListItems.length; i++)
    masterListMapping[masterListItems[i].Id] = true;
for (var subItem = 0; subItem < subItems.length; subItem++) {
    if (masterListMapping[subItems[subItem].Id] == true) { //if it is a sub item
           //do some UI specific thing
    }
}
share|improve this answer
//example item is an object, ID is string
var item = { ID: "exampleID112233",
            data: 4545 }; //sample item

var masterList = {}; //masterList as a dictionary

//for each item created, use its ID as its key.
masterList["exampleID112233"] = item;

var subCat1 = []; //sublist is an array of ID;
subCat1.push("exampleID112233");

//you can also make new sublists as array, push the item's ID in them.
var subCat2 = ["anotherID334455"];

//iterate through sublist
for (var i = 0; i < subCat1.length; i++) {
  //access the referenced item
  masterList[subCat1[i]].data += 4;
}

//DELETING: remove the ID from all sublists, then delete it from masterlist.
share|improve this answer

Why do you want to hardcode referencing when you have language constructs for that?

If you have unique id for items why don't you make them a hash effectively?

// effective {hash}
var masterListItems  = { 
  uid_1: { /* item definition */ },
  uid_2: { /* item definition */ },
  uid_3: { /* item definition */ },
  // ...
};

Then the subset of items can be represented in 3 ways:

// another hash
var subItems = {
    uid_6:   masterListItems["uid_6"],   // effective referencing of the
    uid_321: masterListItems["uid_321"], // masterList items
    // ...
};
// or array of items
var subItems = [
    masterListItems["uid_6"],
    masterListItems["uid_321"],
    // ...
];
// or array of ids
var subItems = [
    "uid_6]",
    "uid_321",
    // ...
];

The tradeoffs:

  • hashes are good for uniquely indexed and effective for lots of get/set operations
  • arrays are good for numerically indexed data, or when the most common usage is iteration
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.